MIND diet

The Mediterranean-DASH Intervention for Neurodegenerative Diet Delay, or more commonly, the MIND diet, combines the portions of the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet and the Mediterranean diet. Both the diet and the diet have been shown to improve cognition; however, neither has been developed to slow neurodegeneration (eg Alzheimer’s disease). Therefore, a team at Rush University Medical Center, headed by Martha Clare Morris (a nutritional epidemiologist), worked to create the MIND diet. Like the DASH and Mediterranean diet, the MIND diet emphasizes the intake of fresh fruit, vegetables, and vegetables. The MIND diet also includes recommendations for specific foods, like leafy greens and berries, which have been scientifically shown to slow cognitive decline. Recent research has shown that the MIND diet is more effective at reducing cognitive decline than either the Mediterranean or DASH diets alone. Additional testing has shown that the level of adherence to the MIND diet also impacts the diet’s neuro-protective effects.

Alzheimer’s dementia affects the percentage of the United States population who are older than 65. This is equivalent to 5.3 million affected individuals. The hallmark characteristic of Alzheimer’s dementia is cognitive decline. If the rate of cognitive decline could be slowed down in the aging population, there could be significant public health and economic impacts. Recently, the drug has been investigated as a potential for reducing cognitive decline and other chronic diseases. Can do alterations to one’s diet, physical activity, and coping mechanisms. Various diets, including the Mediterranean and DASH, have been investigated with relation to cognitive decline. Although neither the Mediterranean nor DASH diets were specifically developed to slow cognitive decline, both were somewhat neuro-protective. In a effort to develop a diet specifically designed for cognitive protection, a group at Chicago ‘s Rush University Medical Center took the lead in the Mediterranean and DASH diets and combined them with recommendations from diet – dementia field. Specifically, the inclusion of leafy greens and berries has been shown in separate human and clinical studies to protect against cognitive decline. The MIND diet was validated through several studies using the Rush Memory and Aging Project; however, the cause and effect relationship between the diet and cognitive decline could not be determined. The inclusion of leafy greens and berries has been shown in separate human and rodent studies to protect against cognitive decline. The MIND diet was validated through several studies using the Rush Memory and Aging Project; however, the cause and effect relationship between the diet and cognitive decline could not be determined. The inclusion of leafy greens and berries has been shown in separate human and rodent studies to protect against cognitive decline. The MIND diet was validated through several studies using the Rush Memory and Aging Project; however, the cause and effect relationship between the diet and cognitive decline could not be determined.

The MIND diet is fairly new; The first article describing the diet and its effectiveness was published in 2015. This is the first study of the Rush Alzheimer’s Disease Center and 960 participants over the age of 50 across a span of five years. Changes in cognitive ability were correlated with specific nutritional components of the MIND diet. The inclusion of higher numbers of dietary supplements in the diet is less likely to be associated with lower levels of intake. A follow-up study compared the effectiveness of the MIND diet to that of the Mediterranean and DASH diets within the same population study. The study showed that all diets can be protective against the development of Alzheimer’s disease when they are strictly followed. The MIND diet was also effective at moderate adherence levels. The study also found that the MIND diet was more accurate at predicting cognitive decline than either Mediterranean or DASH adherence. Although the MIND diet shows promising results, the findings must be confirmed in this study. A drawback of the two studies discussed here is that cause and effect relationships could not be determined. A controlled, diet intervention study would be necessary to determine cause and effect. When designing diets for the prevention of certain diseases, it is necessary to know the impacts of individual nutrients on the human body. The MIND diet could be improved by future research which investigates the impacts of individual nutrients or foods on neuronal physiology and anatomy. It is also beneficial to enable dietary measurements to be made available to dietitians, dietitians, and the general public to draw accurate conclusions from the data.

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