Intermittent fasting

Intermittent fasting (IF) is an umbrella term for various diets that cycle between a period of fasting and non-fasting during a defined period. Intermittent fasting can also be used with calorie restriction for weight loss.

Some people may use intermittent fasting to diminish caloric intake and lose weight. Preliminary research indicates that intermittent fasting can affect risk factors for some diseases. Intermittent fasting protocols can be grouped into 2 categories: whole-day fasting and time-restricted feeding (TRF). The 5: 2 diet became popular in the UK in 2012 after the BBC2 television documentary Horizon Eat, Fast and Live Longer. Via sales of best-selling books, it became widely practiced. According to NHS Choices as of 2012, people considering the 5: 2 diet should first consult a physician, as fasting can sometimes be unsafe. In the UK, 5: 2 the diet could be reduced to the risk of breast cancer, but there is inadequate evidence for such statements.

A 2014 review described that intermittent fasting has been studied in children, the elderly, or the underweight, and could be harmful in these populations. It also suggests that people take care of the gastrointestinal system or circadian rhythm can occur. The review concluded that it is unlikely to be much more important than obesity, such as aging or other chronic conditions, unless combined with long-term calorie restriction and a plant-based diet, such as the Mediterranean diet. According to another 2014 review, intermittent fasting can lead to weight loss, though long-term calorie restriction can lead to Intermittent fasting insulin, triglycerides, and blood glucose in fasting conditions shorter than 24 hours. A 2014 review showed that intermittent fasting can reduce inflammation and possibly affect cancer risk. Reductions in weight, improvements in cardiovascular and metabolic variables, such as fat mass, LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, and C-reactive protein in non-obese individuals have been recorded. Laboratory and preliminary human research indicates that intermittent fasting may influence metabolism of different food sources. in cholesterol, triglycerides, and C-reactive protein in non-obese individuals have been recorded. Laboratory and preliminary human research indicates that intermittent fasting may influence metabolism of different food sources. in cholesterol, triglycerides, and C-reactive protein in non-obese individuals have been recorded. Laboratory and preliminary human research indicates that intermittent fasting may influence metabolism of different food sources.

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