A Vindication of Natural Diet

A Vindication of Natural Diet is an 1813 essay by Shelley Percy Bysshe on vegetarianism and animal rights. It was first written as part of the Queen Mab Notes, which was privately printed in 1813. Later in the year, it was published in a pamphlet.

Shelley wrote four essays on the subject of vegetarianism, “A Vindication of Natural Diet” (1813), the note in Queen Mab, a section of “A Refutation of Deism” (1814), and “On the Vegetable System of Diet” , which was published posthumously in 1929. Shelley first experimented with a vegetarian diet while at Oxford University according to Thomas Jefferson Hogg. Shelley began a vegetarian diet on March 1, 1812 with Harriet Westbrook. Shelley began composing the essay in October-November 1812. The work has been republished since 1813 beginning with an abridged version which was published in Boston by March, Capen, and Lyon in an American Vegetable Diet collection: As Sanctioned by Medical Men, and by Experience in All Ages, edited by William A. Alcott. The essay was reprinted in 1884 in a new edition in London by F. Pitman and by John Heywood and the Vegetarian Society in Manchester. The original title page was reproduced: ” A Vindication of Natural Diet. (London: Printed for J.Callow by Smith & Davy, 1813.) The New edition featured a preface by Henry Stephens Salt and William Axon. A second edition appeared in 1886. In 1904, the work was republished in London by CW Daniel A. A Vindication of Natural Diet and Extracts from the Works of Dr. Lambe, edited and annotated by FE Worland. (London: Printed for J.Callow by Smith & Davy, 1813.) The New edition featured a preface by Henry Stephens Salt and William Axon. A second edition appeared in 1886. In 1904, the work was republished in London by CW Daniel A. A Vindication of Natural Diet and Extracts from the Works of Dr. Lambe, edited and annotated by FE Worland. (London: Printed for J.Callow by Smith & Davy, 1813.) The New edition featured a preface by Henry Stephens Salt and William Axon. A second edition appeared in 1886. In 1904, the work was republished in London by CW Daniel A. A Vindication of Natural Diet and Extracts from the Works of Dr. Lambe, edited and annotated by FE Worland. Read More…

Veganism

The use of the drug is particularly important in the treatment of animals, particularly in diet, and the use of drugs. A follower of the diet is known as a vegan. Distinctions are sometimes made between several categories of veganism. Dietary vegans (or strict vegetarians) refrain from consuming animal products, not only meat but also eggs, dairy products and other animal-derived substances. The term ethical vegan is often applied to those who are not only following a vegan diet but aiming at the philosophy of other lives, and opposing the use of animals for any purpose. Another term is environmental veganism, which refers to the avoidance of animal products on the premise that the industrial farming of animals is environmentally damaging and unsustainable. Matthew Cole, “Veganism,” in Margaret Puskar-Pasewicz (ed.), Cultural Encyclopedia of Vegetarianism, ABC-Clio, 2010 (239-241), 241. Well-planned vegan diets can reduce the risk of some types of chronic disease, including heart disease. They are considered to be appropriate for all stages of life during pregnancy by the American Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, Dietitians of Canada, and the British Dietetic Association. The German Society for Nutrition does not recommend vegan diets for children, nor pregnancy and breastfeeding. Vegan diets tend to be higher in dietary fiber, magnesium, folic acid, vitamin C, vitamin E, iron, and phytochemicals; and lower in dietary energy, saturated fat, cholesterol, long-chain omega-3 fatty acids, vitamin D, calcium, zinc, and vitamin B 12. Unbalanced vegan diets can lead to nutritional deficiencies that nullify any beneficial effects and cause serious health issues. Some of these deficiencies can only be prevented through the choice of fortified foods or the regular intake of dietary supplements. Vitamin B 12 supplementation is particularly important because of its deficiency and causes irreversible neurological damage. Donald Watson coined the term vegan in 1944 when he co-founded the Vegan Society in England. At first he used to mean “non-dairy vegetarian”, but from 1951 the Society defined it as “the doctrine that man should live without exploiting animals”. Interest in veganism in the 2010s, especially in the latter half. Read More…

Soylent (meal replacement)

Soylent is a brand of meal replacement products in the US, named after an artificial food in the science fiction novel Make Room! Make Room! Soylent was introduced in 2014 after a crowdfunding campaign that generated nearly $ 1.5 million in preorders. Its producer, Rosa Foods, says that Soylent meets all nutritional requirements for an average adult. Robine Rhinehart has a first recipe for a self-experiment in nutrition. Subsequently, the powdered version of Soylent was developed into the first product line of Rosa Foods, which currently markets the product. For two months in late 2016, the company also marketed a solid-form meal bar under the name, but it was discontinued after reports that it caused gastrointestinal problems for some consumers. Sales of the powdered version were also halted briefly in late 2016 before the product was reformulated and its sales resumed. Rosa Foods says that the current formulation is based on recommendations of the National Academy of Medicine. They established an FDA nutrition facts label and said the product meets the criteria for some health-related claims. Rosa Foods also states that it is all about the elements of a healthy diet, without excess amounts of sugar, saturated fat or cholesterol. The company is also supportive of genetically modified food. They established an FDA nutrition facts label and said the product meets the criteria for some health-related claims. Rosa Foods also states that it is all about the elements of a healthy diet, without excess amounts of sugar, saturated fat or cholesterol. The company is also supportive of genetically modified food. They established an FDA nutrition facts label and said the product meets the criteria for some health-related claims. Rosa Foods also states that it is all about the elements of a healthy diet, without excess amounts of sugar, saturated fat or cholesterol. The company is also supportive of genetically modified food. Read More…

Raw veganism

Raw veganism is a diet that combines the concepts of veganism and raw foodism. It excludes all food and products of animal origin, as well as food cooked at a temperature above. A raw vegan diet includes raw vegetables and fruits, nuts and nuts, grains and legumes sprouts, seeds, plant oils, sea vegetables, herbs, mushrooms, and fresh juices. There are many different versions of the diet, including fruitarianism, juicearianism, and sproutarianism.

In addition to the ethics of eating meat, dairy, eggs and honey, raw vegans may be motivated by health, spiritual, financial, or environmental reasons, or any combination of these. In terms of health, some raw vegans hold the belief that cooking foods destroys the complex balance of micronutrients. They may also believe that, in the cooking process, dangerous chemicals are produced by the heat interaction with fat, protein, and carbohydrates such as advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) and others. Forest gardening is a radical vegan lifestyle with a number of motives. For example, it can be viewed as a way to recreate the Garden of Eden. Graham Bell (2004). The Permaculture Garden, p.129, “The Forest Garden … This is the original garden of Eden. Read More…

Ovo-lacto vegetarianism

An ovo-lacto vegetarian or lacto-ovo vegetarian is a vegetarian who does not eat meat, but does eat some animal products such as eggs and dairy. Unlike pescatarians, they do not consume fish or other seafood. A typical ovo-lacto vegetarian diet can include fruits, vegetables, grains, nuts, seeds, herbs, roots, fungi, milk, cheese, yogurt, kefir, and eggs.

The terminology stems from the Latin meaning “milk” (as in ‘lactation’), meaning “egg”, and the English term vegetarian, so as giving the definition of a vegetarian diet containing milk and eggs.

In the Western world, ovo-lacto vegetarians are the most common type of vegetarian. Generally speaking, when one uses the term vegetarian an ovo-lacto vegetarian is assumed. Ovo-lacto vegetarians are often well-catered to restaurants and shops, especially in some parts of Europe and metropolitan cities in North America. Read More…

Ovo vegetarianism

Ovo vegetarianism is a type of vegetarianism that allows for the consumption of eggs and not dairy products, in contrast with lacto vegetarianism. Those who practice ovo vegetarianism are called ovo-vegetarians or “eggetarians”. “Ovo” comes from the Latin word for egg.

Ethical motivations for off-farm products are based on the production of milk. Concerns include the practice of keeping a cow poisonous in order to be lactate and the slaughter of unwanted male calves. Other concerns include the standard practice of separating the mother of her calf and denying the calf’s natural source of milk. This contrasts with the industrial practices surrounding egg-laying hens, which produce eggs for human consumption without being fertilized. Ovo-vegetarians often prefer free-range eggs, that is, those produced by uncaged hens. Many ovo-vegetarians refuse to eat fertilized eggs, with balut being an extreme example where the egg has developed. Some vegetarians are lactose intolerant, and are therefore unwilling to consume milk or other dairy products. Read More…

Huel

Huel is a nutritional powder that is intended to provide vitamins, minerals, fats, proteins and carbohydrates. Hats are made from seven ingredients: oats, rice protein, pea protein, sunflower, flaxseed, coconut MCTs, plus a vitamin and mineral blend. The name Huel is a portmanteau of “human fuel”.

Huel was founded by Julian Hearn in 2014 in Aylesbury, England, where the company is still based. James Collier, with the intention of providing 100% of the daily amounts (RDAs) of nutrients as stipulated by the European Food Safety Authority, while being 100% vegan and environmentally friendly. The first Huel product launched in June 2015, with a gluten-free version launched in 2016. In 2016 Huel began shipping to the rest of Europe, and in 2017 it became available in the USA. As of 2018, more than 15 million meals to more than 55 countries. In November 2017, form Life Health Foods UK chief executive James McMaster was appointed as Huel’s new CEO. McMaster joined Julian Hearn’s global ambitions, Read More…

Fruitarianism

Fruitarianism is a diet that is entirely or primarily of fruits in the botanical sense, and possibly nuts and seeds, without animal products. Fruitarianism is a subset of dietary veganism. Fruitarianism may be adopted for different reasons, including ethical, religious, environmental, cultural, economic, and health reasons. There are many varieties of the diet. Some people whose diet consists of 75% or more fruit consider themselves fruitarians.

Some fruitarians will eat only what falls (or would fall) from a plant, that is, that can be harvested without killing or harming the plant. These foods consist primarily of culinary fruits, nuts, and seeds. According to author Adam Gollner, some fruitarians eat only fallen fruit. Some do not eat grains, and some fruitarians do not know it, and some fruitarians feel that it is better for them to eat them, and that they do not have seeds, or any other foods, or any other foods besides juicy fruits. Others believe they should eat only when the plant is eaten. Others eat seeds and some cooked foods. Some fruitarians use the botanical definitions of fruits and consume pulses, such as beans, peas, or other vegetables. Other fruitarians’ diets include raw fruits, dried fruits, nuts, honey and olive oil, or fruits, Read More…

Lacto vegetarianism

A lacto vegetarian (sometimes referred to as a lactarian; from the Latin root lact-, milk) diet is a diet that includes vegetables as well as dairy products such as milk, cheese, yogurt, butter, ghee, cream, and kefir, but excludes eggs. In India, lacto vegetarian is considered synonymous to vegetarian, while eating eggs is considered a form of non-vegetarian diet. The concept and practice of lacto-vegetarianism among a significant number of people comes from ancient India. In other parts of the world, vegetarianism refers to ovo lacto vegetarianism instead, allowing eggs into the diet. Read More…

Copyright foroactivo.eu 2018
Shale theme by Siteturner