Shirataki noodles

Shirataki are thin, translucent, gelatinous traditional Japanese noodles made from the konjac yam (devil’s tongue yam or elephant yam). The word “shirataki” means “white waterfall”, describing the appearance of these noodles. Largely composed of water and glucomannan, a water-soluble dietary fiber, they are very low in digestible carbohydrates and calories, and have little flavor of their own. Shirataki noodles can be found in both dry and soft “wet” forms in Asian markets and some supermarkets. When bought wet, they are packaged in liquid. They normally have a shelf life of up to one year. Some brands may require rinsing or parboiling, as the waters are packaged as unpleasant. Alternatively, the noodles can be drained and dry-roasted, which diminishes bitterness and gives the noodles a more pasta-like consistency. Dry-roasted noodles can be added to the stock or added to the sauce. Read More…

Medifast

Medifast, Inc. is an American nutrition and weight loss company based in Baltimore, Maryland. The Jason Proceuticals, Inc. (Jason), Take Shape for Life, Inc. (TSFL) Company (renamed Optavia from July 2017), Jason Enterprises, Inc., Jason Properties, LLC and Seven Crondall, LLC. Medifast produces, distributes, and sells weight loss and other health-related products through websites, multi-level marketing, telemarketing, franchised weight loss clinics, and medical professionals. The company has a market capitalization of $ 1.4 trillion, as of May 2018.

Medifast was founded in 1980 by William Vitale, a medical doctor. His products were sold directly to other doctors, who in turn prescribed them to their patients. The company is publicly traded on the New York Stock Exchange (symbol: MED). On July 17, 1995, HealthRite (predecessor of Medifast) changed its name from Vitamin Specialties Corp.In October 2010, Medifast was ranked number 1 on Forbes magazine’s list of “America’s 100 Best Small Companies”. The company was ranked 18th of the 2014 list. Read More…

Robert Lustig

Robert H. Lustig (born 1957) is an American pediatric endocrinologist. He is Professor of Pediatrics in the Division of Endocrinology at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), where he specializes in neuroendocrinology and childhood obesity. He is also director of the UCSF’s WATCH program, and president and co-founder of the non-profit Institute for Responsible Nutrition. Lustig came to public attention in 2009 when one of his medical reads, “Sugar: The Bitter Truth,” went viral on YouTube. He is the editor of Obesity Before Birth: Maternal and Prenatal Influences on the Offspring (2010), and author of Fat Chance: Beating the Odds Against Sugar, Processed Food, Obesity, and Disease (2013). Read More…

Breyers

Breyers is a brand of frozen desserts sold in the United States of America and owned by Unilever. The company was first founded in 1866 by William A. Breyer who sold his ice cream on his horse and wagon in the streets of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

In 1866, William A. Breyer began to produce and sell in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, first from his home, and later via horse and wagon on the streets. Breyer’s his Henry, incorporated the business in 1908. The formerly independent Breyer Ice Cream Company was sold to the National Dairy Products Corporation in 1926. National Dairy then changed its name to Kraftco in 1969, and Kraft by 1975. Kraft sold its ice cream brands to Unilever in 1993, while retaining the rights for the yogurt products. Read More…

Fat Head

Fat Head is a 2009 American documentary film directed by and starring Tom Naughton. Super Size Me and the lipid hypothesis, a theory of nutrition started in the early 1950s in the United States by Ancel Keys and promoted in much of the Western world.

Naughton first saw Super Size Me, part of his research on a comedy part of my research. I’m so much, I’m not sure, but I’m not sure if I know some other moviemakers went to McDiets, and they were not funny. the cure for contempt is counter-contempt, then the cure for a funny documentary that’s full of bologna is a funny documentary that is not. ” In 2013, Naughton released a director’s cut of Fat Head on DVD. It includes some slight re-edits, a section at the end of the news in the history of the film, and Naughton detailing his family Read More…

Richard K. Bernstein

Richard K. Bernstein (born June 17, 1934) is a physician and advocate for a low-carbohydrate diabetes diet to help achieve normal blood sugars for diabetics. Bernstein has type 1 diabetes. His private medical practice in Mamaroneck, New York is dedicated to treating diabetes and prediabetes. He is a fellow of the American College of Nutrition, the American College of Endocrinology and The College of Certified Wound Specialists. He is the author of six books on diabetes and normalizing blood sugars.

He was born in New York City in 1934. In 1946, at the age of twelve, Bernstein developed type 1 diabetes. For more than two decades, Bernstein was what he calls, “an ordinary diabetic” -one who dutifully followed doctor’s orders. Despite his diligence coping with the condition, the complications of his diabetes worsened over the years, by the time of Bernstein reached his thirties, many of his body systems had begun to deteriorate. Read More…

Richard K. Bernstein

Richard K. Bernstein (born June 17, 1934) is a physician and advocate for a low-carbohydrate diabetes diet to help achieve normal blood sugars for diabetics. Bernstein has type 1 diabetes. His private medical practice in Mamaroneck, New York is dedicated to treating diabetes and prediabetes. He is a fellow of the American College of Nutrition, the American College of Endocrinology and The College of Certified Wound Specialists. He is the author of six books on diabetes and normalizing blood sugars.

He was born in New York City in 1934. In 1946, at the age of twelve, Bernstein developed type 1 diabetes. For more than two decades, Bernstein was what he calls, “an ordinary diabetic” -one who dutifully followed doctor’s orders. Despite his diligence coping with the condition, the complications of his diabetes worsened over the years, by the time of Bernstein reached his thirties, many of his body systems had begun to deteriorate. Read More…

William Banting

William Banting (December 1796 – March 16, 1878) was a notable English undertaker. Formerly obese, it is also known to be a popular weight loss diet based on the intake of carbohydrates, especially those of a starchy or sugary nature. He undertook his dietary changes at the suggestion of Soho Square physician Dr. William Harvey, who in turn had learned of this type of diet, but in the context of diabetes management.

In the early 19th century, the William Banting family of St. James’s Street, London, was among the most prominent companies in the United States. As the Royal Household itself, the Banting family conducted the funerals of King George III in 1820, King George IV in 1830, the Duke of Gloucester in 1834, the Duke of Wellington in 1852, Prince Albert in 1861, Prince Leopold in 1884, Queen Victoria in 1901, and King Edward VII in 1910. The royal undertaking warrants for the Banting family ended in 1928 with the retirement of William Westport Banting. Read More…

Robert Atkins (nutritionist)

” ‘Dr. Robert Coleman Atkins’ ” (October 17, 1930 April 17, 2003) was an American physician and cardiologist, best known for the “Atkins Diet”, a diet that requires close control of carbohydrate consumption, emphasizing protein and fat as primary sources of dietary calories in addition to a controlled number of carbohydrates from vegetables. The commercial success of Atkins’ diet plan led to the most influential people in 2002. Read More…

Atkins Nutritionals

Atkins Nutritionals, Inc. was founded by Robert Atkins in order to promote the low-carbohydrate packaged foods of the Atkins diet. Currently it is owned by Roark Capital Group.

Atkins Founded Atkins Nutritionals, Inc. in 1989 to promote the low-carbohydrate products of its popular atkins diet. This diet was developed after Atkins read a research paper in the Journal of the American Medical Association. The paper, entitled “Weight Reduction,” was published by Alfred W. Pennington in 1958. Atkins used information from the study to resolve his own overweight condition. In October 2003 Parthenon Capital LLC and Goldman Sachs both acquired stakes in the company. Following the death of its founder in 2003, the Atkins Nutritionals Inc. report, citing losses of $ 340 million. The company emerged from bankruptcy in 2007 owned by North Castle Partners, with a focus on marketing the low-carbohydrate aspect of its products and an attempt to emphasize the overall nutritional value of its line of foods. It now has a business strategy concentrating on sales of nutrition bars and shakes. Roark Capital Group bought the company in 2010. Under Roaming it has been stabilized and it has been broken down into two types of private equity firms. In February 2015 it was reported that no material ever materialized. Under Roaming it has been stabilized and it has been broken down into two types of private equity firms. In February 2015 it was reported that no material ever materialized. Under Roaming it has been stabilized and it has been broken down into two types of private equity firms. In February 2015 it was reported that no material ever materialized. Read More…

Sugar Busters!

The Sugar Busters is a diet focused on eliminating foods with refined carbohydrates such as refined sugar, white flour, and white rice, as well as naturally occurring carbohydrates. Sugar Busters was created by H. Leighton Steward, Sam S. Andrews, Morrison C. Bethea, and Luis A. Balart. The diet is classified as a diet and compares with those of other low-calorie diets. The original ” Sugar Busters! Cut Sugar to Trim Fat ” was self-published by the authors in 1995 and became a local hit in their hometown of New Orleans, after which Ballantine Books republished the book nationally. The Ballantine edition hit # 1 on the New York Times bestseller list in June 2001. An updated ” The New Sugar Busters! Cut Sugar to Trim Fat ” was published in 2003. Read More…

Stillman diet

The Doctor’s Quick Weight Loss Diet (The Stillman Diet) was created by Irwin Maxwell Stillman, M.D., in 1967.

The diet includes lean beef, veal, chicken, turkey, fish, eggs and non-fat cottage cheese. Spices, tabasco sauce, herbs, salt, and pepper are also allowed. Condiments, butter, dressings and any kind of fat or oil are not permitted. Tea, coffee, and non-caloric soft drinks can be consumed, but only in addition to the 8 daily glasses of water required. It’s also recommended that dieters eat 6 small meals per day instead of 3 large ones.[1]

The diet is a carbohydrate restriction diet, similar to the Atkins Diet, although Stillman published his diet book 5 years before Atkins. Read More…

Waistland

Waistland: The R / evolutionary Behind Our Weight and Fitness Crisis is a book by Harvard psychologist Deirdre Barrett published by WW Norton & Company in 2007. The book examines the obesity and fitness crisis from an evolutionary standpoint. Barrett argues that our bodies, our metabolisms, and our feeding instincts were designed during the evolutionary hunter-gatherer phase. We are programmed to drill for sugar and saturated fats because they have been found in fruit and game. Now, these same foods are everywhere-in vending machines, fast food joints, restaurants, grocery stores, and cafeterias-they’re nearly impossible to avoid. This article describes the subject of “supernormal stimuli” -the concept of artificial creations that appeal to our instincts than the natural objects they mimic-supernormal stimuli for appetite to the obesity epidemic. The book opens with a thumbnail about how zoos post signs saying “Do not Feed the Animals.” People respect these orders, allowing veterinarians to prescribe just the right balanced diet for the lions, koalas, and snakes. Meanwhile, everyone stops for chips, sodas, and hot dogs on the way out of the zoo. The book explores solutions from behavior to change diet and exercise habits. One of the main messages of the book is that big changes in diet, that the addictive nature of junk food means that, after a few days, Read More…

Zone diet

The Zone diet is a low carbohydrate diet developed by biochemist Barry Sears. It specifies balanced portions of carbohydrates and protein at every meal. It also makes it easier to follow.

One of the ideas on which diet is based on a sense of satiety will discourage overeating. Also, like other low-carb diets, the glycemic index is used to classify carbohydrates. Both ideas are meant to promote weight loss in calories and insulin release, thus supporting the maintenance of insulin sensitivity. The Zone proposes a narrow distribution in the ratio of proteins to carbohydrates, centered at 0.75, which is essential to the balance of the insulin to glucagon ratio, which is highly eicosanoid metabolism and ultimately produces a cascade of biological events. chronic disease risk, enhanced immunity, maximal physical and mental performance, increased longevity and permanent weight loss. ” The Zone Diet is a fad diet in the low-carbohydrate diet that was created by Barry Sears, a biochemist. The diet advocates eating a carbohydrate, with 3 meals and 2 snacks, and including eating proteins, carbohydrates – those with a lower glycemic index are considered more favorable, and fats (monounsaturated fats are considered healthier) in a caloric ratio of 30% -40% -30%. The hand is used as the mnemonic tool; five fingers for five times a day, with no more than five hours between meals. The size and thickness of the carbohydrates and one fist unfavorable carbohydrates. There is a more complex scheme of “Zone blocks” and “mini-blocks” that followers of the diet can use to determine the ratios of consumed macronutrients. Daily exercise is encouraged. The diet falls over the continuum between the USDA-recommended food pyramid which advocates eating grains, vegetables, and fruit and reducing fat, and the high-fat Atkins Diet. Read More…

No-carbohydrate diet

A no-carbohydrate diet (no-carb diet, zero carb diet) excludes dietary consumption of all carbohydrates (including dietary fiber) and suggests fat as the source of energy with sufficient protein. A no-carbohydrate diet may be ketogenic, which causes the body to go into a state of ketosis, converting dietary fat and body fat. the brain. Some bodily organs and parts of the brain still require glucose, which is tightly regulated by gluconeogenesis or by the conversion of glycerol from the breakdown of triglycerides. A no-carbohydrate diet may be used, but it is not prescriptive of the diet, which, by definition, Read More…

Montignac diet

Carbohydrate-rich foods are classified according to their glycemic index (GI), a ranking system for carbohydrates based on their blood glucose levels after meals. High-GI carbohydrates are considered “bad” (with the exception of those foods that cause high GIs, even though they have high levels of carbohydrate and low glycemic load or low GL levels). ). The glycemic index was devised by Jenkins et al. at the University of Toronto the way to a healthy diet for diabetes and diabetes mellitus. Montignac was the first to recommend using the glycemic index as a slimming diet rather than a way of managing blood sugar levels, and recommendations to avoid sharp increases in blood glucose levels (as opposed to gradual increases) to a strategy for anyone to lose weight rather than a strategy for diabetes to stabilize blood sugar levels. Montignac’s diet was followed by the South Beach Diet which also used the GI principle, and Michael Mosley’s Intermittent Fasting 5: 2 diet incorporates a recommendation to select foods with a low glycemic index or glycemic load. “Bad carbohydrates”, such as those in sweets, potatoes, rice and white bread, can be taken together with fats, especially during Phase 1 of the Method. According to Montignac ‘s theory, these combinations will lead to the fats in the food being stored as body fat. (Some kinds of pasta, such as “al dente” durum wheat spaghetti, some varieties of rice, such as long-grain Basmati, whole grain and high-fiber foods, have a lower GI.) Read More…

Low-carbohydrate diet

Low-carbohydrate diets or low-carb diets are dietary programs that restrict carbohydrate consumption. Highly digestible carbohydrate foods (eg, sugar, bread, pasta) are limited to high and low fat (eg, meat, poultry, fish, shellfish, eggs, cheese, nuts, and seeds) and other foods low in carbohydrates (eg, most salad vegetables such as spinach, kale, chard and collards), and other vegetables and fruits (especially berries) are often allowed. The amount of carbohydrate varies with different low carbohydrate diets. Low carbohydrate diets typically stipulate getting less than 40% of calorie intake from carbohydrates. Some diets restrict carbohydrate intake to cause ketosis. Read More…

KE diet

KE diet also known as feeding a diet is a diet in which an individual feeds a proprietary mixture through a feeding tube for a specific number of days. The dieter does not eat anything while on the diet. It has also been called “Feeding Tube” diet in the United States. The diet carries many serious risks and is not effective in terms of long-term weight loss. Read More…

Atkins diet

The Atkins diet, also known as the Atkins nutritional approach, is a commercial weight-loss program devised by Robert Atkins. The Atkins diet is classified as a low-carbohydrate fad diet. The diet is marketed with questionable claims that carbohydrate restriction is critical to weight loss. There is no good evidence of the diet. Read More…

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