Wednesday

Wednesday is the day of the week between Tuesday and Thursday. According to international standard ISO 8601 it is the third day of the week. In countries that use the Sunday-first convention, and in the Jewish Hebrew calendar Wednesday is defined as the fourth day of the week. The name is derived from Old English Wōdnesdæg and Middle English Wednesdei, “day of Woden”, reflecting the pre-Christian religion practiced by the Anglo-Saxons. In other languages, such as the Wednesday or Italian mercoledì, the day is a layer of dies Mercurii “day of Mercury”. It has the most letters out of all the Gregorian calendar days. Wednesday is in the middle of the day of the Western five-day workweek that starts on Monday and finishes on Friday. Read More…

Water fasting

Water fasting is a type of fasting in which the practitioner consumes only water. One may water fast for a variety of reasons, including medical and religious requirements.

Jains maintain a strict water-only fast for 8-10 (digambar & Swetambar) days, during the days of Paryushan. Read More…

Sallekhana

Hallkhana (IAST:), also known as Samlehna, Santhara, Samadhi-marana or Sanyasana-marana; is a supplementary vow to the ethical code of conduct of Jainism. It is the religious practice of voluntarily fasting to death by the diet of food and liquids. It is viewed in Jainism as the thinning of human passions and the body, and another means of destroying rebirth-influencing karma by withdrawing all physical and mental activities. It is not considered a suicide by Jain scholars because it is not an act of passion, nor does it deploy poisons or weapons. After the roomkhana vow, the ritual preparation and practice can extend into years. Sallekhana is a vow Jain ascetics and householders. These are some of the most important things in the world, including queens, in Jain history. However, in the modern era, death through hall has been a relatively uncommon event. There is debate about the practice from a right to life and a freedom of religion viewpoint. In 2015, the Rajasthan High Court banned the practice, considering it suicide. Later that year, the Supreme Court of India stayed at the Rajasthan High Court and lifted the ban on Hallkhana. Read More…

Ocsober

Ocsober is an Australian fundraising initiative that encourages people to give up alcohol for the month of October. The money raised by voluntary participants goes to Life Education Australia, the organization behind the educational mascot, Healthy Harold. For over 30 years, the well-known giraffe has been teaching. During 2014, Ocsober reached $ 1,000,000 to help Life Education Australia and Healthy. Ocsober is also used as an opportunity to highlight the growing danger of binge drinking and alcohol abuse, particularly among young Australians. The statistics provided by Life Education estimates that 3,200 Australians die as a result of excessive alcohol consumption each year, while 81,000 end up in hospitals for the same reason. The organization behind this initiative is also hoping to promote more permanent changes to the Australian drinking habits. Participants will not only help a good cause, but also help you to improve your chances of success. Read More…

Nineteen-Day Fast

The Nineteen-Day Fast is a nineteen-day period of the year, during which members of the Bahá’í Faith adhere to a sunrise-to-sunset fast. Along with obligatory prayer, it is one of the greatest obligations of a Bahá’í, and its chief purpose is spiritual; to reinvigorate the soul and bring closer to God. The fast was instituted by the Bab, and accepted by Bahá’u’lláh, the founder of the Bahá’í Faith, who stated its rules in his book of laws, the Kitáb-i-Aqdas. The nineteen days of fasting occur immediately before the beginning of the Bahá’í New Year, on the vernal equinox (around March 1/2 to March 19/20).

The Báb, the founder of the Bábí Faith, published the Persian Bayán, and stated that the last month would be a period of fasting. The Báb stated that the true meaning of the fast was abstaining from all except the love of the Messengers from God. The Báb also stated that the continuation of the contingent of the approval of a messianic figure, Him Whom God Shall Make Manifest. Bahá’u’lláh, the founder of the Bahá’í Faith, who claims to be a foretold by the Báb, accepted the fast, but altered many of its details and regulations. The Bahá’í fast sets fasting practices of several other religions. Lent is a period of fasting for Christians, Yom Kippur and many other holidays for Jews, and the fast of Ramadan is practiced by Muslims. The Bahá ‘ Read More…

Minnesota Starvation Experiment

The Minnesota Starvation Experiment, also known as the Minnesota Semi-Starvation Experiment, the Minnesota Starvation-Recovery Experiment and the Starvation Study, was a clinical study performed at the University of Minnesota between November 19, 1944 and December 20, 1945. The investigation was The effects of severe dietary restrictions on the physiological and psychological effects of severe dietary restriction. The motivation of the study was twofold: first, to produce a definitive treatise on the subject of human starvation based on a laboratory simulation of severe famine and, second, to use the scientific results and Asia at the end of World War II. It was recognized early in 1944 that millions of people were in grave danger of mass starvation as a result of the conflict, and the information was needed regarding the effects of semi-starvation and the impact of various rehabilitation strategies-if postwar relief efforts were be effective. The study was developed in collaboration with the Civilian Public Service (CPS) and the Selective Service System and used by CPS volunteers. The study was divided into three phases: A twelve-week control phase, where physiological and psychological observations were collected to establish a baseline for each subject; a 24-week starvation phase, during which the caloric intake of each subject was drastically reduced-causing each participant to lose an average of 25% of their pre-starvation body weight; and finally a recovery phase, in which various rehabilitative diets have been tried to re-nourish the volunteers. Two subjects were dismissed for failing to maintain the dietary restrictions during the early phase of the experiment, and the data for two others were used in the analysis of the results. In 1950, Ancel Keys and his colleagues published the results of the Minnesota Starvation Experiment in a two-volume, 1.385 page text entitled The Biology of Human Starvation (University of Minnesota Press). While this is a very important step in the past, it has had a significant impact on the postwar recovery efforts, which have been produced and used extensively by the United States. in which various rehabilitative diets were tried to re-nourish the volunteers. Two subjects were dismissed for failing to maintain the dietary restrictions during the early phase of the experiment, and the data for two others were used in the analysis of the results. In 1950, Ancel Keys and his colleagues published the results of the Minnesota Starvation Experiment in a two-volume, 1.385 page text entitled The Biology of Human Starvation (University of Minnesota Press). While this is a very important step in the past, it has had a significant impact on the postwar recovery efforts, which have been produced and used extensively by the United States. in which various rehabilitative diets were tried to re-nourish the volunteers. Two subjects were dismissed for failing to maintain the dietary restrictions during the early phase of the experiment, and the data for two others were used in the analysis of the results. In 1950, Ancel Keys and his colleagues published the results of the Minnesota Starvation Experiment in a two-volume, 1.385 page text entitled The Biology of Human Starvation (University of Minnesota Press). While this is a very important step in the past, it has had a significant impact on the postwar recovery efforts, which have been produced and used extensively by the United States. Two subjects were dismissed for failing to maintain the dietary restrictions during the early phase of the experiment, and the data for two others were used in the analysis of the results. In 1950, Ancel Keys and his colleagues published the results of the Minnesota Starvation Experiment in a two-volume, 1.385 page text entitled The Biology of Human Starvation (University of Minnesota Press). While this is a very important step in the past, it has had a significant impact on the postwar recovery efforts, which have been produced and used extensively by the United States. Two subjects were dismissed for failing to maintain the dietary restrictions during the early phase of the experiment, and the data for two others were used in the analysis of the results. In 1950, Ancel Keys and his colleagues published the results of the Minnesota Starvation Experiment in a two-volume, 1.385 page text entitled The Biology of Human Starvation (University of Minnesota Press). While this is a very important step in the past, it has had a significant impact on the postwar recovery efforts, which have been produced and used extensively by the United States. and the data for two others were not used in the analysis of the results. In 1950, Ancel Keys and his colleagues published the results of the Minnesota Starvation Experiment in a two-volume, 1.385 page text entitled The Biology of Human Starvation (University of Minnesota Press). While this is a very important step in the past, it has had a significant impact on the postwar recovery efforts, which have been produced and used extensively by the United States. and the data for two others were not used in the analysis of the results. In 1950, Ancel Keys and his colleagues published the results of the Minnesota Starvation Experiment in a two-volume, 1.385 page text entitled The Biology of Human Starvation (University of Minnesota Press). While this is a very important step in the past, it has had a significant impact on the postwar recovery efforts, which have been produced and used extensively by the United States. Read More…

Juice fasting

Juice fasting, also known as juice cleansing, is a fad diet in which a person consumes only fruit and vegetable juices while otherwise abstaining from food consumption. It is used for a detoxification of alternative medicine and is often part of detox diets. This page is sponsored with implausible and unvidenced claims for its health benefits.

Juice fasting is closely associated with detox. Catherine Collins, Chief Dietician of St. George’s Hospital Medical School in London, England, states that “The concept of ‘detox’ is a marketing myth rather than a physiological entity.The idea that an avalanche of vitamins, minerals, and laxatives taken over a 2 to 7 day period can have a long-lasting benefit for the body is also a marketing myth. ” Detox diets, depending on the type and duration, are seen as dangerous and can cause various types of muscle loss and unhealthy re-gaining fat after detox ends. Juice mixes with grapefruit juice may also adversely interact with certain prescription drugs. Read More…

Prahlad Jani

Prahlad Jani (), also known as “Mataji”, (born Chunriwala Mataji, August 13, 1929) is an Indian breatharian sadhu who claims to have lived without food and water since 1940. He says that the goddess Amba sustains him.

Born Chunriwala Mataji, Jani grew up in Charada village in Mehsana district. According to Jani, he left his home in Rajasthan at the age of seven, and went to live in the jungle. At the age of 11, Jani underwent a religious experience and became a follower of the Hindu goddess Amba. From that time, he is a devotee of Amba, wearing a red sari-like garment, a jewelery and crimson flowers in his shoulder-length hair. Is known as Mataji (“[manifestation of] The Great Mother”). Jani believes that the goddess provides him a liquid sustenance or water which drops through a hole in his palate, allowing him to live without food or drink. Since the 1970s, Jani has lived in a cave in the rainforest near the Gujarati temple of Ambaji, Read More…

Hunger strike

A hunger strike is a method of nonvoluntary resistance or pressure in which participants have an active role in political protest, or to provoke feelings of guilt in others, usually with the objective to achieve a specific goal, such as a policy change. Most hunger strikers will take liquids but not solid food. In cases where an entity (usually the state) has the ability to obtain custody of the hunger striker (such as a prisoner), the hunger strike is often terminated by the custodial entity through the use of force-feeding. Read More…

Linda Hazzard

Linda Burfield Hazzard (December 18, 1867 – June 24, 1938) was an American quack doctor noted for her promotion of fasting as a treatment; She was imprisoned by the state of Washington for a number of the results of this disease. She was born 1867 in Carver County, Minnesota, and died during a fast in 1938. Read More…

Valter Longo

Valter D. Longo (born October 9, 1967) is an Italian-American biogerontologist and cell biologist known for his studies on the role of fasting and nutrient response. mechanisms in many eukaryotes. He is currently a professor at the USC Davis School of Gerontology with a position in the Department of Biological Sciences and the USC Longevity Institute.

Originally from Genoa, Italy, Valter Longo attended the University of North Texas majoring in Biochemistry. In 1992 he joined the laboratory of “calorie restriction” pioneer Roy Walford at UCLA where he studied calorie restriction and aging of the immune system. He completed his PhD work in Biochemistry studying antioxidant enzymes and anti-aging genes under Joan Valentine at UCLA in 1997 and his postdoctoral training in the neurobiology of Alzheimer’s Disease under Caleb Finch at the University of Southern California. Since 1997 he has been a faculty member at the USC Davis School of Gerontology and Ethel Percy Andrus Gerontology Center. Longo is a member of the USC’s Biology of Aging program as well as the director of the USC Longevity Institute, also launched the USC Davis School of Gerontology. s first study-abroad program, a summer class in the nutrition and genetics of aging in Italy. In 2011, he was profiled on the Wormhole with Morgan Freeman for his longevity-related research. Read More…

Fasting in Jainism

Fasting is very common among Jains and as a part of festivals. Most days at special times, during festivals, and on holy days. Paryushan is the most prominent festival, lasting eight days in Svetambara Jain tradition and ten days in Digambar Jain tradition during the monsoon. The monsoon is a time of fasting. However, Jain may be at any time, especially if he or she feels guilty. Variations in fasts encourages Jains to do whatever they can to maintain whatever self control is possible for the individual. According to Jain texts, deep concentration is fasting (upavāsa).

Fasting can be done to both the body and mind fasts are also done as a penalty. Read More…

Fasting in Islam

Fasting in Islam, known as Sawm () or Siyām (), the Arabic words for fasting, also known as Rūzeh or Rōzah () in some Muslim countries, is the practice of abstaining, usually from food and drink. The observance of Sawm during the Islamic holy month of Ramadan is the fourth of the Five Pillars of Islam, but it is not only about that month.

Literally meaning “to abstain,” ṣawm is a semitic cognate to ṣawmā, “ṣōm”, and “ṣom”.

The Muslims of Central Asia, Afghanistan, India, Iran, Bangladesh, Pakistan and Turkey uses the words roza / rozha / roja / oruç, which comes from Persian. While the Malay community in Malaysia, Brunei and Singapore call it puasa, which is derived from Sanskrit, upvaasa, puasa is also used in Indonesia, Southern Thailand and Southern Philippines. Read More…

Fast day

Fast Day was a holiday observed in the United States between 1670 and 1991. “A day of public fasting and prayer,” it was traditionally observed in the New England states. It was early in the early days of the American colonies by Royal Governors, often before the spring planting (see Rogation Days). It was observed by church attendance, fasting, and abstinence from secular activities. The earliest known day was proclaimed in Boston on September 8, 1670. Fast day had lost its significance as a religious holiday by the late 19th century. It was abolished by Massachusetts in 1894 (being replaced with Patriots ‘Day) and shortly thereafter by Maine, which also adopted Patriots’ Day. It continued in New Hampshire until 1991, signifying only the opening of the summer tourist season; 1991, and then in 1999, Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. Read More…

Edward H. Dewey

Edward Hooker Dewey (21 May 1837 – 21 December 1904), best known as Edward H. Dewey was an American physician. He was a pioneer of therapeutic fasting and the inventor of the “No Breakfast Plan”.

Dewey graduated from the College of Medicine and Surgery of the University of Michigan in 1864 with a medical degree, and became an assistant surgeon in the Army of the United States. From 1866 he started to work in Meadville, Pennsylvania. Dewey’s The True Science of Living (1895) had been reprinted at least four times by 1908. His Sequel The No-Breakfast Plan and the Fasting Cure (1900) was very successful with the public. By 1921 it had gone through three editions and was translated into French and German. Dewey argued for people to completely abstain from breakfast, and only consume two meals per day. He attributed all diseases and physiological problems to excessive eating. He advocated long fasts and believed that abstinence from food could cure insanity and mental disorders. Dewey was a protestant and affirmed harmony of his ” Read More…

Dharna

A Dharna is a non-violent sit-in protest, which may include a lot of work. , in India, a way of obtaining compliance with a claim for justice, or a payment of a debt. Mahatma Gandhi’s satyagraha form of civil disobedience and protest. In India, there is a place for conducting Dharna, and a permission is required for it. Often, those practicing dharna break leading permission to clash with law enforcement. Dharnah refers to fixing one’s mind on an object. It refers to whole-heartedly pledging to an outcome or to inculcating a directed attitude. Dharna is consciously and diligently holding a point of view. The word originates from the Sanskrit word dharnam. In Pakistan, the term was first used in 1958 by Abdul Qayyum Khan against the Prime Minister Feroze Khan’s administration to remove his President Iskander Mirza but its effective use was made by Naeem Siddiqui Ahmed and Jammat e Islami organized in Pakistan in 1993, Imran Khan, Dr. Tahir ul Qadri and other political and religious leaders are now attempting to use this strategy for their purposes.
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Dry January

Dry January is a public health campaign urging people to abstain from alcohol for the month of January, particularly practiced in the United Kingdom. The campaign, as a formal entity, appears to be relatively recent, but in the last year of the year, the Suiser January 1942 as part of its war effort. The term “Dry January” was registered by the charity Alcohol Concern in mid-2014; The first ever Alcohol Concern partnered with Public Health England. In January 2014, 17,000 Britons stopped drinking for that month. Read More…

Preoperative fasting

Preoperative fasting is the practice of a patient. This is intended to prevent pulmonary aspiration of the stomach contents during general anesthesia.

The main reason for preoperative fasting is to prevent pulmonary aspiration of the stomach while under the effects of general anesthesia. Aspiration of as little as 30-40 mL can be a significant cause of suffering and death during an operation and therefore fasting. Several factors can be predisposed to aspiration of stomach contents including inadequate anesthesia, pregnancy, obesity, difficult airways, emergency surgery (since fasting time is reduced), full stomach and altered gastrointestinal mobility. Increased fasting times leads to Read More…

Orthopathy

Orthopathy (from the Greek ὀρθός orthos “right” and πάθος pathos “suffering”) or Natural Hygiene (NH) is a set of alternative medical beliefs and practices originating from the Nature Cure movement. Proponents claim that fasting, dieting, and other lifestyle measures are necessary to prevent and treat disease. Orthopathy is most prevalent and alternative medical treatment, with the exception of surgery in certain situations, such as for a broken bone and a deadly secondary cause. Orthopathy has its roots in naturopathy and first emerged in the early nineteenth century. Read More…

Intermittent fasting

Intermittent fasting (IF) is an umbrella term for various diets that cycle between a period of fasting and non-fasting during a defined period. Intermittent fasting can also be used with calorie restriction for weight loss.

Some people may use intermittent fasting to diminish caloric intake and lose weight. Preliminary research indicates that intermittent fasting can affect risk factors for some diseases. Intermittent fasting protocols can be grouped into 2 categories: whole-day fasting and time-restricted feeding (TRF). The 5: 2 diet became popular in the UK in 2012 after the BBC2 television documentary Horizon Eat, Fast and Live Longer. Via sales of best-selling books, it became widely practiced. According to NHS Choices as of 2012, people considering the 5: 2 diet should first consult a physician, as fasting can sometimes be unsafe. In the UK, 5: 2 the diet could be reduced to the risk of breast cancer, but there is inadequate evidence for such statements. Read More…

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