Sugar Busters!

The Sugar Busters is a diet focused on eliminating foods with refined carbohydrates such as refined sugar, white flour, and white rice, as well as naturally occurring carbohydrates. Sugar Busters was created by H. Leighton Steward, Sam S. Andrews, Morrison C. Bethea, and Luis A. Balart. The diet is classified as a diet and compares with those of other low-calorie diets. The original ” Sugar Busters! Cut Sugar to Trim Fat ” was self-published by the authors in 1995 and became a local hit in their hometown of New Orleans, after which Ballantine Books republished the book nationally. The Ballantine edition hit # 1 on the New York Times bestseller list in June 2001. An updated ” The New Sugar Busters! Cut Sugar to Trim Fat ” was published in 2003. Read More…

Stillman diet

The Doctor’s Quick Weight Loss Diet (The Stillman Diet) was created by Irwin Maxwell Stillman, M.D., in 1967.

The diet includes lean beef, veal, chicken, turkey, fish, eggs and non-fat cottage cheese. Spices, tabasco sauce, herbs, salt, and pepper are also allowed. Condiments, butter, dressings and any kind of fat or oil are not permitted. Tea, coffee, and non-caloric soft drinks can be consumed, but only in addition to the 8 daily glasses of water required. It’s also recommended that dieters eat 6 small meals per day instead of 3 large ones.[1]

The diet is a carbohydrate restriction diet, similar to the Atkins Diet, although Stillman published his diet book 5 years before Atkins. Read More…

Sensa (diet)

Alan Hirsch, an American neurologist and psychiatrist. The product lacks scientific evidence and the subject of controversy and lawsuits. Following a $ 26 million fine by the US Federal Trade Commission in 2014, the company ceased operations.

According to the sensa diet, you can eat your favorite foods without counting calories, deprivation, or cravings. Sensa crystals, and that will result in weight-loss. These “Sensa crystals” were developed by Alan Hirsch, MD, the founder and neurologist of the Smell and Taste Treatment and Research Foundation in Chicago. The Sensa crystals (or “tastants”) are said to promote feelings of fullness and, ultimately, weight loss. If a person sticks with Sensa, the website claims that a person could lose 30 pounds in six months. Read More…

Master Cleanse

Master Cleanse is a modified juice that allows for no food, substituting tea and lemonade made with maple syrup and cayenne pepper. Proponents claim that the diet detoxifies the body and removes excess fat. There is no scientific evidence that the diet removes any toxins, or that it achieves anything beyond temporary weight loss. Uncertain to be harmful, Master Cleanse and similar programs can be harmful over the long term. In addition to its beneficial effects, short-term side effects may include fatigue, nausea, dizziness, and dehydration, while long term harm includes loss of muscle mass and increased risk of heart attack.

Master Cleanse was developed by Stanley Burroughs, who published it in the 1940s, and revived it in 1976 in his book The Master Cleanser and Healing for the Age of Enlightenment. Read More…

The Cambridge Diet

The Cambridge Diet is a diet in which 600 to 1500 calories are consumed per day, mainly in the diet. These products are made in the UK and include shakes, meal replacement bars, soups and smoothies.

The Cambridge Diet was developed in 1970 by Dr. Alan Howard at Cambridge University, England. It was launched as a commercial product in the United States in 1980. The Diet was very popular in America but was also the subject of some controversy. It was decided that the regulators and health authorities were affected. In the UK, the Cambridge Diet was launched in 1984. In 1986 the Diet was reformulated to adhere to recommendations made by the Commission on Medical Aspects (COMA) The Cambridge Diet is categorized as a very low-calorie diet, starting as low as 415 calories / day, and as a fad diet. The British Dietetic Association list the possible adverse side effects as “bad breath, dry mouth, tiredness, dizziness, insomnia, nausea and constipation”,

Cabbage soup diet

The cabbage soup is a radical weight loss diet designed around a low-calorie low calorie diet. It is generally considered a fad diet, in which it is designed for short-term weight-loss and requires no long-term commitment. The typical claim of the diet is to lose 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of weight in a week, though nutritional experts argue that it is almost impossible to lose that much fat in a week.

The origins of the diet are unknown, and it first gained popularity as a piece of fax in the 1980s. The diet has many names, usually linking the diet to a mainstream institution, including the “Sacred Heart Diet”, “Military Cabbage Soup”, “TJ Miracle Soup Diet”, and “Russian Peasant Diet”. All of the institutions have a relationship with the diet. As a general rule, the most important thing is that the dieter can consume as much as he wants. Read More…

Dave Asprey

Dave Asprey is an entrepreneur, businessman and author from Albuquerque, NM. He founded Bulletproof 360, Inc. in 2013 and founded Bulletproof Nutrition Inc. in 2014. Asprey is a “biohacker,” creator of “Bulletproof Coffee” and the “Bulletproof Diet”, and authored a book describing the diet. Asprey is also known for being the Internet for commerce, selling caffeine-molecule t-shirts via the alt.drugs.caplantin newsgroup in 1994. Previously, Asprey held executive and director positions for technology companies including Trend Micro, Blue Coat Systems and Citrix Systems. Read More…

The 4-Hour Body

The 4-Hour Body: An Uncommon Guide to Rapid Fat-Loss, Incredible Sex, and Superhuman Becoming is a nonfiction book by American writer Tim Ferriss. It was published by the Crown Publishing Group in 2010. It focuses on diet, with chapters on exercise, sleep, and sexual performance. The book is attracted to some controversy for its claims.

Ferriss said that he spent three years interviewing 200 people, from doctors to athletes to black-market drug salesmen, in preparing the book. The book advocates the ‘Slow-carb Diet’, which is characterized by three main points: eat a very simple set of meals repeatedly, focus on ‘slow carbs’, and allow one ‘cheat day’. The diet involves the elimination of starches and anything sweet, and a strong preference for lean protein and a few specific vegetables. Read More…

Juice fasting

Juice fasting, also known as juice cleansing, is a fad diet in which a person consumes only fruit and vegetable juices while otherwise abstaining from food consumption. It is used for a detoxification of alternative medicine and is often part of detox diets. This page is sponsored with implausible and unvidenced claims for its health benefits.

Juice fasting is closely associated with detox. Catherine Collins, Chief Dietician of St. George’s Hospital Medical School in London, England, states that “The concept of ‘detox’ is a marketing myth rather than a physiological entity.The idea that an avalanche of vitamins, minerals, and laxatives taken over a 2 to 7 day period can have a long-lasting benefit for the body is also a marketing myth. ” Detox diets, depending on the type and duration, are seen as dangerous and can cause various types of muscle loss and unhealthy re-gaining fat after detox ends. Juice mixes with grapefruit juice may also adversely interact with certain prescription drugs. Read More…

South Beach Diet

The South Beach Diet is a popular fad diet developed by Arthur Agatston and promoted in a best-selling 2003 book. It emphasizes eating high-fiber, low-glycemic carbohydrates, unsaturated fats, and lean protein, and categorizes carbohydrates and fats as “good” or “bad”. Like other fad diets, it does not exist

The diet has three stages, and increases the proportion of carbohydrate consumed as it progresses while simultaneously decreasing the proportions of fat and protein. It includes a number of recommended foods such as lean meats and vegetables, and has a concept of “good” (mostly monounsaturated) fats. It makes no restriction on calorie intake, includes an exercise program, and is based on taking meals and two snacks per day. The first stage of the diet (13 lbs in two weeks). According to the UK’s National Health Service (NHS), the severity of the first stage of the diet may result in the loss of some vitamins, minerals and fiber. The NHS reports that dietary restrictions can be difficult because of bad breath, dry mouth, tiredness, dizziness, insomnia, Read More…

Scarsdale diet

The Scarsdale Diet is a fad diet designed for weight loss created in the 1970s by Herman Tarnower, named for the town in New York where he practiced cardiology, described in the book “The Complete Scarsdale Medical Diet Plus Dr. Tarnower’s Lifetime Keep-Slim Program ”, which Tarnower wrote with an author of self-help books, Sam Sinclair Baker. The diet carries the risk of becoming infected with the disease. The diet is calling for high protein and low fat carbohydrates, but also emphasizes fruits and vegetables. The diet’s high fat ratio can increase the risk of heart disease. People following the diet can lose much weight at But this loss is generally better than with normal calorie restriction. The book was originally published in 1978 and received an unexpected boost from Herman Tarnower, was murdered in 1980 by his jilted lover Jean Harris. A made-for-tv movie, The People vs. Jean Harris, capitalized on the infamous murder, and was broadcast in 1981. Jean Harris was portrayed by Ellen Burstyn. Read More…

Fit for Life

Fit for Life (FFL) is a diet and lifestyle book series stemming from the principles of orthopathy. It is sponsored by the American authors Harvey and Marilyn Diamond. The Fit for Life book series recommends dietary principles in the morning, eating predominantly “live” and “high-water-content” food, and if eating animal protein to avoid combining it with complex carbohydrates. While the diet has been prepared by the dietitians and nutritionists, and the American Dietetic Association and the American Academy of Family Physicians list it as a fad diet. Read More…

Zone diet

The Zone diet is a low carbohydrate diet developed by biochemist Barry Sears. It specifies balanced portions of carbohydrates and protein at every meal. It also makes it easier to follow.

One of the ideas on which diet is based on a sense of satiety will discourage overeating. Also, like other low-carb diets, the glycemic index is used to classify carbohydrates. Both ideas are meant to promote weight loss in calories and insulin release, thus supporting the maintenance of insulin sensitivity. The Zone proposes a narrow distribution in the ratio of proteins to carbohydrates, centered at 0.75, which is essential to the balance of the insulin to glucagon ratio, which is highly eicosanoid metabolism and ultimately produces a cascade of biological events. chronic disease risk, enhanced immunity, maximal physical and mental performance, increased longevity and permanent weight loss. ” The Zone Diet is a fad diet in the low-carbohydrate diet that was created by Barry Sears, a biochemist. The diet advocates eating a carbohydrate, with 3 meals and 2 snacks, and including eating proteins, carbohydrates – those with a lower glycemic index are considered more favorable, and fats (monounsaturated fats are considered healthier) in a caloric ratio of 30% -40% -30%. The hand is used as the mnemonic tool; five fingers for five times a day, with no more than five hours between meals. The size and thickness of the carbohydrates and one fist unfavorable carbohydrates. There is a more complex scheme of “Zone blocks” and “mini-blocks” that followers of the diet can use to determine the ratios of consumed macronutrients. Daily exercise is encouraged. The diet falls over the continuum between the USDA-recommended food pyramid which advocates eating grains, vegetables, and fruit and reducing fat, and the high-fat Atkins Diet. Read More…

Whole30

The Whole30 is a 30-day fad diet that emphasizes whole foods and during which participants eliminate sugar, alcohol, grains, vegetables, soy, and dairy from their diets. The Whole30 is similar to the more restrictive than the paleo diet, as adherents may not eat natural sweeteners like honey or maple syrup. Foods allowed during the program include meat, nuts, seeds, seafood, eggs, vegetables, and fruits. During the Whole30, participants are advised to count calories or to weigh themselves. After the program is complete, participants are counseled to strategically reintroduce the foods of the whole30 list, document the health consequences and culinary value of these additions, and determine if the addition is desired. The program’s founders believe that sugar, grains, dairy, alcohol, and vegetables affect weight, energy, and stress levels. Read More…

Raw foodism

Raw foodism, also known as a raw food diet, is the dietary practice of eating only (or mostly) food that is uncooked and unprocessed. Depending on the philosophy, or type of lifestyle and desired products, raw food diets may include a selection of fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds, eggs, fish, meat, and dairy products. It may also include various types of sprouted seeds, cheese, and fermented foods such as yogurts, kefir, kombucha, or sauerkraut, but these foods have been pasteurized, homogenized, or produced with the use of synthetic pesticides. , chemical fertilizers, industrial solvents, or chemical food additives. Read More…

Pritikin diet

The Pritikin diet is a low-fat, high-fiber diet which forms part of the “Pritikin Program for Diet and Exercise”, a lifestyle regimen originally created by Nathan Pritikin. The 1979 book describing the diet became a bestseller.

The diet is based on low-fat, high-fiber food, and reduced meat, alcohol and processed food. When it was started the diet was considered radical, but its precepts are largely controlled by mainstream nutritional advice. The Pritikin Diet has been categorized as a fad diet with a possible boring food choice, flatulence, and the risk of feeling too hungry. Read More…

Paleolithic diet

The terms Paleolithic diet, paleo diet, caveman diet, and stone-age diet describe modern fad diets requiring the sole or predominant consumption of foods to be consumed by humans during the Paleolithic era. The digestive abilities of anatomically modern humans, however, are different from those of Paleolithic humans, which undermines the diet’s core premise. During the 2.6-million-year-long Paleolithic era, the highly variable climate and global spread of human populations were, by necessity, nutritionally adaptable. Supporters of the diet mistakenly presupposes that human digestion has been essentially unchanged over time. While there is much variability in the way of the diet is explained, the diet usually includes vegetables, fruits, nuts, roots, and meat products, such as grains, sugar, vegetables, processed oils, salt, alcohol or coffee. The diet is based on not just processed foods, but rather the foods that humans began to eat after the Neolithic Revolution when humans transitioned from hunter-gatherer lifestyles to settled agriculture. The ideas behind the diet can be traced to Walter Voegtlin, and were popularized in the best-selling books of Loren Cordain. Like other fad diets, the Paleo diet is promoted as a way of improving health. There is some evidence that this diet can be compared to those of the body and to the weight of the body. There is no good evidence, however, that the diet helps with weight loss, other than through the normal mechanisms of calorie restriction. Following the Paleo diet can lead to inadequate calcium intake, and side effects can include weakness, diarrhea, and headaches. Read More…

No-carbohydrate diet

A no-carbohydrate diet (no-carb diet, zero carb diet) excludes dietary consumption of all carbohydrates (including dietary fiber) and suggests fat as the source of energy with sufficient protein. A no-carbohydrate diet may be ketogenic, which causes the body to go into a state of ketosis, converting dietary fat and body fat. the brain. Some bodily organs and parts of the brain still require glucose, which is tightly regulated by gluconeogenesis or by the conversion of glycerol from the breakdown of triglycerides. A no-carbohydrate diet may be used, but it is not prescriptive of the diet, which, by definition, Read More…

Morning banana diet

The Morning Banana Diet is a fad diet that was popular in Japan in 2008 and had some practice in the West. The diet plan allows you to eat a meal or a meal. Lunch and dinner food choices are unrestricted. Users may have one or more bananas, but no other desserts are permitted. Nothing is eaten after 8 pm, and the dieter must go to bed by midnight. The diet was created by Osaka pharmacist Sumiko Watanabe, who lost 37 pounds (16.8 kg) in weight. He popularized the diet when he wrote it on Mixi, one of Japan’s largest social networking services. Over 730,000 Morning Banana Diet Books were sold in 2008. Possible problems with the diet include the misuse of the unregulated lunch and dinner. Read More…

Montignac diet

Carbohydrate-rich foods are classified according to their glycemic index (GI), a ranking system for carbohydrates based on their blood glucose levels after meals. High-GI carbohydrates are considered “bad” (with the exception of those foods that cause high GIs, even though they have high levels of carbohydrate and low glycemic load or low GL levels). ). The glycemic index was devised by Jenkins et al. at the University of Toronto the way to a healthy diet for diabetes and diabetes mellitus. Montignac was the first to recommend using the glycemic index as a slimming diet rather than a way of managing blood sugar levels, and recommendations to avoid sharp increases in blood glucose levels (as opposed to gradual increases) to a strategy for anyone to lose weight rather than a strategy for diabetes to stabilize blood sugar levels. Montignac’s diet was followed by the South Beach Diet which also used the GI principle, and Michael Mosley’s Intermittent Fasting 5: 2 diet incorporates a recommendation to select foods with a low glycemic index or glycemic load. “Bad carbohydrates”, such as those in sweets, potatoes, rice and white bread, can be taken together with fats, especially during Phase 1 of the Method. According to Montignac ‘s theory, these combinations will lead to the fats in the food being stored as body fat. (Some kinds of pasta, such as “al dente” durum wheat spaghetti, some varieties of rice, such as long-grain Basmati, whole grain and high-fiber foods, have a lower GI.) Read More…

Mediterranean Diet Foundation

The Mediterranean Diet Foundation (Fundación Dieta Mediterránea, FDM) is a non-profit organization based in Barcelona that aims to promote the study, investigation and dissemination of the benefits of the Mediterranean diet.

Its mission is to promote investigation of the health, historical, cultural and gastronomical aspects of the Mediterranean diet. Another of the Foundation’s objectives is the dissemination of scientific findings on the diet and the promotion of its healthful use among different population groups. Read More…

Macrobiotic diet

A macrobiotic diet (or macrobiotics) is a fad diet fixed on the ideas of food drawn from Zen Buddhism. The diet is trying to balance the price of yin and yang Major principles of macrobiotic diets are to reduce animal product, and are consumed in the diet. Macrobiotics writers often claim that a macrobiotic is helpful for people with cancer and other chronic diseases, and that the diet can be harmful. Studies that indicate positive results are of poor methodological quality. Neither the American Cancer Society and Cancer Research UK recommend adopting the diet. Suggestions that a macrobiotic diet improves cardiovascular disease and diabetes are explained by the diet being, in part, Read More…

Low-carbohydrate diet

Low-carbohydrate diets or low-carb diets are dietary programs that restrict carbohydrate consumption. Highly digestible carbohydrate foods (eg, sugar, bread, pasta) are limited to high and low fat (eg, meat, poultry, fish, shellfish, eggs, cheese, nuts, and seeds) and other foods low in carbohydrates (eg, most salad vegetables such as spinach, kale, chard and collards), and other vegetables and fruits (especially berries) are often allowed. The amount of carbohydrate varies with different low carbohydrate diets. Low carbohydrate diets typically stipulate getting less than 40% of calorie intake from carbohydrates. Some diets restrict carbohydrate intake to cause ketosis. Read More…

KE diet

KE diet also known as feeding a diet is a diet in which an individual feeds a proprietary mixture through a feeding tube for a specific number of days. The dieter does not eat anything while on the diet. It has also been called “Feeding Tube” diet in the United States. The diet carries many serious risks and is not effective in terms of long-term weight loss. Read More…

High-protein diet

A high-protein diet is often recommended by bodybuilders and nutritionists to help you build muscle and lose fat. The high-protein diet is a nutrition that should be consumed every day. However, it should not be confused with low-carbohydrate diets, such as the Atkins Diet, which are not food-energy-controlled and which often contain large amounts of fat. Some examples of high-protein diet include lean beef, chicken or poultry, pork (tenderloin, rib chops, shoulder blade steak), salmon and tuna, eggs, soy, and lots more. A high-protein diet is often very low on fat or carbohydrates. Due to the limited amount of carbs available, the body starts burning extra body fats. People will often feel less hungry, thus, making them lose weight relatively easy. HOWEVER, Read More…

Hay diet

The Hay Diet is a nutrition method developed by the New York physician William Howard Hay in the 1920s. It claims to work by separating food into three groups: alkaline, acidic, and neutral. (Acid foods are not combined with the alkaline ones. Acidic foods are protein rich, such as meat, fish, dairy, etc. Alkaline foods are rich carbohydrates, such as rice, grains and potatoes. It is also known as the food combining diet. A similar theory, called nutripathy, was developed by Gary A. Martin in the 1970s. Others who have promulgated alkaline-acid diets include Edgar Cayce, Jarvis DC, and Robert O. Young. Read More…

Grapefruit diet

The grapefruit diet, also known as the Hollywood Diet is a short-term fad diet that has existed in the United States since at least the 1930s. The diet is based on a grapefruit has a fat-burning enzyme or similar property. The variations of the diet are so low in calories (below 800-1,000 calories a day), too low in carbohydrates, or too low in essential micronutrients are considered unhealthy and dangerous. While eating a grapefruit juice with a meal, it can be used in the diet of a person who is allergic to a person with grapefruit juice or is allergic to citrus. This diet will not be beneficial to anyone over a long period of time because of the low calorie intake could lead to malnutrition and many health problems. The grapefruit diet also does not require exercise. The grapefruit diet is a low-carb diet. It suggests that grapefruit helps to burn body fat when eaten with foods in dietary fat, which is why the grapefruit diet encourages consumption of meat, eggs, and other foods that are rich in fat and protein. Read More…

Food combining

Food combining (also known as a trophic) is a term for a dietary approach that advocates specific combinations of foods as well as carbohydrate-rich foods and protein-rich foods in the same meal. It was prepared by Herbert M. Shelton in his book Food Combining Made Easy (1951). The best-known food-combining diet is the Hay Diet; Hay lost 30 pounds in 3 months when he implemented his research. One randomized controlled trial of food combining has been performed, and found no evidence that a balanced diet has been achieved. Read More…

Fad diet

A fad diet or dietary supplement is a diet that makes it more likely that it will be more likely to have a significant impact on life. <ref name = “Nestle2006b”> Celebrity endorsements are frequently used to promote fad diets, which may generate significant revenue for the creators of the product. Read More…

Cotton ball diet

The cotton ball diet is a fad diet that is consumed with cotton balls dipped in liquids such as juices or smoothies. The cotton is intended to make a person’s stomach feel full without them gaining weight. The diet has been repeatedly condemned as dangerous. Read More…

Cookie diet

A cookie is a calorie restriction diet conceived to produce weight loss, based on a meal replacement in the form of a specially formulated cookie. Cookie diets include the Smart for Life Cookie Diet, Dr. Siegal’s Cookie Diet, Hollywood Cookie Diet and R & D Diet Cookie. All require 4 to 6 cookies per day, sometimes in addition to other food, such as one meal of six ounces of meat in the box of the Siegal diet. Read More…

Blood type diet

The blood type diets are fad diets advocated by several authors, the most prominent of whom is Peter J. D’Adamo. These diets are based on the concept that blood type, according to the ABO blood group system, is the most important factor in determining a healthy diet, and each author recommends a separate diet for each blood type. The consensus among dietitians, physicians, and scientists is that these diets are unsupported by scientific evidence. Read More…

Beverly Hills Diet

The Beverly Hills Diet is a fad diet developed by author Judy Mazel (1943 – 2007) in her 1981 bestseller, The Beverly Hills Diet.

Mazel had tried and failed to lose weight, and developed the diet after spending six months working with a nutritionist in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Under her program, she was able to trim down from a weight of to, having struggled with her weight since childhood. After completing the development of the Los Angeles, she was introduced to a weight-loss clinic where clients included a number of celebrities. The Beverly Hills Diet is one of the most popular foods in the digestive process, and has been controlled by these foods. The plan begins with the consumption of a series of products. On Days 11 to 18, the dieter can add bread, two tablespoons of butter and three cobs of corn. Sources of complete protein, such as steak or lobster, may not be consumed until Day 19 of the plan. The book, published by Macmillan Publishing on 30 weeks on the New York Times bestseller list, and sold more than one million copies. The book features endorsements from Linda Gray, Engelbert Humperdinck, Sally Kellerman and Mary Ann Mobley. Read More…

Atkins diet

The Atkins diet, also known as the Atkins nutritional approach, is a commercial weight-loss program devised by Robert Atkins. The Atkins diet is classified as a low-carbohydrate fad diet. The diet is marketed with questionable claims that carbohydrate restriction is critical to weight loss. There is no good evidence of the diet. Read More…

Alkaline diet

Alkaline diet (also known as the alkaline diet, alkaline acid diet, acid alkaline diet) describes a group of dietary agents based on the difference in diet. body. It is more important that the osteoporosis researches, however, are more likely to maintain the belief that certain foods can affect the acidity (pH) of the body and can be used to treat or prevent disease. It is not recommended that dietitians, but they should not be affected by this condition, although they have noted that they are unlikely to be affected by this condition. These diets have been promoted by alternative medicine practitioners, with the proposal that such diets treat or prevent cancer, heart disease, and low energy levels and other illnesses. Human blood is regulated at pH 7.35 to 7.45. Levels above 7.45 are referred to as alkalosis and levels below 7.35 as acidosis. Both are potentially serious, and the body has acid-base homeostasis mechanisms that do not happen. The idea that these diets can be materially affected by blood pH is a method of treatment that is not supported by scientific research and makes it more or less unfair. Diets avoiding meat, poultry, cheese, and grains can be used to make the urine more alkaline (higher pH). However, difficulties in effectively predicting the effects of this diet to medications, rather than modifying diet, as the preferred method of changing urine pH. The “acid-ash” hypothesis was considered a risk factor for osteoporosis, although the current weight of scientific evidence does not support this hypothesis. Read More…

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