7 Minute Workout to lose weight fast, burn fat and tone your body

The 7 Minute Workout is the training offered by a study at the McMaster University that showed that high-intensity 7-minute are sufficient for:

– Burning fat more quickly

– Maximizing caloric consumption

– Training the muscles of the whole body,

– Improving health by reducing the risk of cardio vascular diseases such as heart attack and stroke.

One of the best home gym workouts designed to tone your body and lose maximum fat in the shortest period of time possible.

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Obesity and the environment

Obesity and the environment aims at the different environmental factors that have been determined by researchers to cause and perpetuate obesity.

Studies have shown that they are prevalent in both people and animals. There have been no links between this obesity trend and diet and exercise. According to Professor Robert H. Lustig from the University of California, San Francisco, “[E] ven those at the lower end of the body mass index (BMI) curve are gaining weight. trigger. ” The theory of environmental obesogens offers a different causal facet to obesity – that lifetime exposure to xenobiotic chemicals can change the body’s metabolic system. Chemical obesogens are molecules that do not properly regulate lipid metabolism in the body and should therefore promote obesity. Data is scarce, but some in-vitro studies have found this model to be an accurate predictor of future obesity. A study suggests that smoking before and during pregnancy, for example, increases the risk of obesity in children of school age. Many chemicals that are known or suspected to be obesogens are endocrine disruptors. These obesogens are present in common-use products. In a University at Albany, State University of New York study, organotins were found in a handbag designer, vinyl blinds, wallpaper, tile, and vacuum cleaner dust collected from 20 houses. Phthalates, which have been linked to obesity, are present in many other categories, such as laundry products, and personal care products. Bisphenol A (BPA), is a known environmental obesogen but makes up longer fat cells larger. Effects of obesogens in infants and children – glucose intolerance and more abdominal fat. The study concludes that obesogens change an individual’s metabolic set points for gaining weight. What little research has been conducted on the relationship between chemical exposure and body mass indexes to obesogens as a contributor to the obesity epidemic. Some endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) belong to this class of compounds. Bruce Blumberg, a professor of developmental and cell biology at UC Irvine, has found compelling evidence that exposure to the chemical Tributyltin (TBT), a compound used in pesticides, can trigger fat cell creation. As several cases have confirmed, Many farm workers in America have been unknowingly unknowingly working in fields that have been recently sprayed with TBT and other dangerous chemicals. Among the wide variety of health risks, the workers may bear a disproportionate risk of exposure to such obesogens. The law of the land and the law of the land, the law of the land and the law of the land, to the livelihood of many farm workers. Read More…

Hunza diet

The Hunza diet consists of a series of selective food and drink intake by the Hunza people of northern Pakistan. The diet mostly consists of nuts, fruits and vegetables added with yogurt. The cooked meal, daal included with chappati, is included for dinner. It has also been advocated for being inexpensive and mostly self-productive.

The late Irish Dr Macarrison is believed to have traveled to British Raj and tested this diet in England. The results are claimed by the rats. In his book about the Hunza, Jay Hoffman argued that dogs and horses should be kept up to 120 to 150 years of age. Read More…

CRON-diet

The CRON-diet is a nutrient-rich, reduced calorie diet developed by Roy Walford, Lisa Walford, and Brian M. Delaney. The CRON-diet involves calorie restriction in the hope that the practice will improve and delay aging, while still attempting to provide daily amounts of various nutrients. Other names include CR-diet, Longevity diet, and Anti-Aging Plan. The Walfords and Delaney, among others, founded the CR Society International to promote the CRON-diet.

The CRON-diet was developed by Walford compiled during his participation in Biosphere 2. Read More…

BistroMD, Inc.

BistroMD, headquartered in Naples, Florida is a weight loss program that offers healthy, chef-prepared weight-loss meal options for delivery. The company was founded in 2005 by University of Miami School of Medicine graduate, Caroline J. Cederquist, MD along with her husband Ed Cederquist.

The program is broken down into two weight loss plans: 5 days or 7 days of entries. Read More…

A Vindication of Natural Diet

A Vindication of Natural Diet is an 1813 essay by Shelley Percy Bysshe on vegetarianism and animal rights. It was first written as part of the Queen Mab Notes, which was privately printed in 1813. Later in the year, it was published in a pamphlet.

Shelley wrote four essays on the subject of vegetarianism, “A Vindication of Natural Diet” (1813), the note in Queen Mab, a section of “A Refutation of Deism” (1814), and “On the Vegetable System of Diet” , which was published posthumously in 1929. Shelley first experimented with a vegetarian diet while at Oxford University according to Thomas Jefferson Hogg. Shelley began a vegetarian diet on March 1, 1812 with Harriet Westbrook. Shelley began composing the essay in October-November 1812. The work has been republished since 1813 beginning with an abridged version which was published in Boston by March, Capen, and Lyon in an American Vegetable Diet collection: As Sanctioned by Medical Men, and by Experience in All Ages, edited by William A. Alcott. The essay was reprinted in 1884 in a new edition in London by F. Pitman and by John Heywood and the Vegetarian Society in Manchester. The original title page was reproduced: ” A Vindication of Natural Diet. (London: Printed for J.Callow by Smith & Davy, 1813.) The New edition featured a preface by Henry Stephens Salt and William Axon. A second edition appeared in 1886. In 1904, the work was republished in London by CW Daniel A. A Vindication of Natural Diet and Extracts from the Works of Dr. Lambe, edited and annotated by FE Worland. (London: Printed for J.Callow by Smith & Davy, 1813.) The New edition featured a preface by Henry Stephens Salt and William Axon. A second edition appeared in 1886. In 1904, the work was republished in London by CW Daniel A. A Vindication of Natural Diet and Extracts from the Works of Dr. Lambe, edited and annotated by FE Worland. (London: Printed for J.Callow by Smith & Davy, 1813.) The New edition featured a preface by Henry Stephens Salt and William Axon. A second edition appeared in 1886. In 1904, the work was republished in London by CW Daniel A. A Vindication of Natural Diet and Extracts from the Works of Dr. Lambe, edited and annotated by FE Worland. Read More…

Veganism

The use of the drug is particularly important in the treatment of animals, particularly in diet, and the use of drugs. A follower of the diet is known as a vegan. Distinctions are sometimes made between several categories of veganism. Dietary vegans (or strict vegetarians) refrain from consuming animal products, not only meat but also eggs, dairy products and other animal-derived substances. The term ethical vegan is often applied to those who are not only following a vegan diet but aiming at the philosophy of other lives, and opposing the use of animals for any purpose. Another term is environmental veganism, which refers to the avoidance of animal products on the premise that the industrial farming of animals is environmentally damaging and unsustainable. Matthew Cole, “Veganism,” in Margaret Puskar-Pasewicz (ed.), Cultural Encyclopedia of Vegetarianism, ABC-Clio, 2010 (239-241), 241. Well-planned vegan diets can reduce the risk of some types of chronic disease, including heart disease. They are considered to be appropriate for all stages of life during pregnancy by the American Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, Dietitians of Canada, and the British Dietetic Association. The German Society for Nutrition does not recommend vegan diets for children, nor pregnancy and breastfeeding. Vegan diets tend to be higher in dietary fiber, magnesium, folic acid, vitamin C, vitamin E, iron, and phytochemicals; and lower in dietary energy, saturated fat, cholesterol, long-chain omega-3 fatty acids, vitamin D, calcium, zinc, and vitamin B 12. Unbalanced vegan diets can lead to nutritional deficiencies that nullify any beneficial effects and cause serious health issues. Some of these deficiencies can only be prevented through the choice of fortified foods or the regular intake of dietary supplements. Vitamin B 12 supplementation is particularly important because of its deficiency and causes irreversible neurological damage. Donald Watson coined the term vegan in 1944 when he co-founded the Vegan Society in England. At first he used to mean “non-dairy vegetarian”, but from 1951 the Society defined it as “the doctrine that man should live without exploiting animals”. Interest in veganism in the 2010s, especially in the latter half. Read More…

Soylent (meal replacement)

Soylent is a brand of meal replacement products in the US, named after an artificial food in the science fiction novel Make Room! Make Room! Soylent was introduced in 2014 after a crowdfunding campaign that generated nearly $ 1.5 million in preorders. Its producer, Rosa Foods, says that Soylent meets all nutritional requirements for an average adult. Robine Rhinehart has a first recipe for a self-experiment in nutrition. Subsequently, the powdered version of Soylent was developed into the first product line of Rosa Foods, which currently markets the product. For two months in late 2016, the company also marketed a solid-form meal bar under the name, but it was discontinued after reports that it caused gastrointestinal problems for some consumers. Sales of the powdered version were also halted briefly in late 2016 before the product was reformulated and its sales resumed. Rosa Foods says that the current formulation is based on recommendations of the National Academy of Medicine. They established an FDA nutrition facts label and said the product meets the criteria for some health-related claims. Rosa Foods also states that it is all about the elements of a healthy diet, without excess amounts of sugar, saturated fat or cholesterol. The company is also supportive of genetically modified food. They established an FDA nutrition facts label and said the product meets the criteria for some health-related claims. Rosa Foods also states that it is all about the elements of a healthy diet, without excess amounts of sugar, saturated fat or cholesterol. The company is also supportive of genetically modified food. They established an FDA nutrition facts label and said the product meets the criteria for some health-related claims. Rosa Foods also states that it is all about the elements of a healthy diet, without excess amounts of sugar, saturated fat or cholesterol. The company is also supportive of genetically modified food. Read More…

Raw veganism

Raw veganism is a diet that combines the concepts of veganism and raw foodism. It excludes all food and products of animal origin, as well as food cooked at a temperature above. A raw vegan diet includes raw vegetables and fruits, nuts and nuts, grains and legumes sprouts, seeds, plant oils, sea vegetables, herbs, mushrooms, and fresh juices. There are many different versions of the diet, including fruitarianism, juicearianism, and sproutarianism.

In addition to the ethics of eating meat, dairy, eggs and honey, raw vegans may be motivated by health, spiritual, financial, or environmental reasons, or any combination of these. In terms of health, some raw vegans hold the belief that cooking foods destroys the complex balance of micronutrients. They may also believe that, in the cooking process, dangerous chemicals are produced by the heat interaction with fat, protein, and carbohydrates such as advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) and others. Forest gardening is a radical vegan lifestyle with a number of motives. For example, it can be viewed as a way to recreate the Garden of Eden. Graham Bell (2004). The Permaculture Garden, p.129, “The Forest Garden … This is the original garden of Eden. Read More…

Ovo-lacto vegetarianism

An ovo-lacto vegetarian or lacto-ovo vegetarian is a vegetarian who does not eat meat, but does eat some animal products such as eggs and dairy. Unlike pescatarians, they do not consume fish or other seafood. A typical ovo-lacto vegetarian diet can include fruits, vegetables, grains, nuts, seeds, herbs, roots, fungi, milk, cheese, yogurt, kefir, and eggs.

The terminology stems from the Latin meaning “milk” (as in ‘lactation’), meaning “egg”, and the English term vegetarian, so as giving the definition of a vegetarian diet containing milk and eggs.

In the Western world, ovo-lacto vegetarians are the most common type of vegetarian. Generally speaking, when one uses the term vegetarian an ovo-lacto vegetarian is assumed. Ovo-lacto vegetarians are often well-catered to restaurants and shops, especially in some parts of Europe and metropolitan cities in North America. Read More…

Ovo vegetarianism

Ovo vegetarianism is a type of vegetarianism that allows for the consumption of eggs and not dairy products, in contrast with lacto vegetarianism. Those who practice ovo vegetarianism are called ovo-vegetarians or “eggetarians”. “Ovo” comes from the Latin word for egg.

Ethical motivations for off-farm products are based on the production of milk. Concerns include the practice of keeping a cow poisonous in order to be lactate and the slaughter of unwanted male calves. Other concerns include the standard practice of separating the mother of her calf and denying the calf’s natural source of milk. This contrasts with the industrial practices surrounding egg-laying hens, which produce eggs for human consumption without being fertilized. Ovo-vegetarians often prefer free-range eggs, that is, those produced by uncaged hens. Many ovo-vegetarians refuse to eat fertilized eggs, with balut being an extreme example where the egg has developed. Some vegetarians are lactose intolerant, and are therefore unwilling to consume milk or other dairy products. Read More…

Huel

Huel is a nutritional powder that is intended to provide vitamins, minerals, fats, proteins and carbohydrates. Hats are made from seven ingredients: oats, rice protein, pea protein, sunflower, flaxseed, coconut MCTs, plus a vitamin and mineral blend. The name Huel is a portmanteau of “human fuel”.

Huel was founded by Julian Hearn in 2014 in Aylesbury, England, where the company is still based. James Collier, with the intention of providing 100% of the daily amounts (RDAs) of nutrients as stipulated by the European Food Safety Authority, while being 100% vegan and environmentally friendly. The first Huel product launched in June 2015, with a gluten-free version launched in 2016. In 2016 Huel began shipping to the rest of Europe, and in 2017 it became available in the USA. As of 2018, more than 15 million meals to more than 55 countries. In November 2017, form Life Health Foods UK chief executive James McMaster was appointed as Huel’s new CEO. McMaster joined Julian Hearn’s global ambitions, Read More…

Fruitarianism

Fruitarianism is a diet that is entirely or primarily of fruits in the botanical sense, and possibly nuts and seeds, without animal products. Fruitarianism is a subset of dietary veganism. Fruitarianism may be adopted for different reasons, including ethical, religious, environmental, cultural, economic, and health reasons. There are many varieties of the diet. Some people whose diet consists of 75% or more fruit consider themselves fruitarians.

Some fruitarians will eat only what falls (or would fall) from a plant, that is, that can be harvested without killing or harming the plant. These foods consist primarily of culinary fruits, nuts, and seeds. According to author Adam Gollner, some fruitarians eat only fallen fruit. Some do not eat grains, and some fruitarians do not know it, and some fruitarians feel that it is better for them to eat them, and that they do not have seeds, or any other foods, or any other foods besides juicy fruits. Others believe they should eat only when the plant is eaten. Others eat seeds and some cooked foods. Some fruitarians use the botanical definitions of fruits and consume pulses, such as beans, peas, or other vegetables. Other fruitarians’ diets include raw fruits, dried fruits, nuts, honey and olive oil, or fruits, Read More…

Shirataki noodles

Shirataki are thin, translucent, gelatinous traditional Japanese noodles made from the konjac yam (devil’s tongue yam or elephant yam). The word “shirataki” means “white waterfall”, describing the appearance of these noodles. Largely composed of water and glucomannan, a water-soluble dietary fiber, they are very low in digestible carbohydrates and calories, and have little flavor of their own. Shirataki noodles can be found in both dry and soft “wet” forms in Asian markets and some supermarkets. When bought wet, they are packaged in liquid. They normally have a shelf life of up to one year. Some brands may require rinsing or parboiling, as the waters are packaged as unpleasant. Alternatively, the noodles can be drained and dry-roasted, which diminishes bitterness and gives the noodles a more pasta-like consistency. Dry-roasted noodles can be added to the stock or added to the sauce. Read More…

Medifast

Medifast, Inc. is an American nutrition and weight loss company based in Baltimore, Maryland. The Jason Proceuticals, Inc. (Jason), Take Shape for Life, Inc. (TSFL) Company (renamed Optavia from July 2017), Jason Enterprises, Inc., Jason Properties, LLC and Seven Crondall, LLC. Medifast produces, distributes, and sells weight loss and other health-related products through websites, multi-level marketing, telemarketing, franchised weight loss clinics, and medical professionals. The company has a market capitalization of $ 1.4 trillion, as of May 2018.

Medifast was founded in 1980 by William Vitale, a medical doctor. His products were sold directly to other doctors, who in turn prescribed them to their patients. The company is publicly traded on the New York Stock Exchange (symbol: MED). On July 17, 1995, HealthRite (predecessor of Medifast) changed its name from Vitamin Specialties Corp.In October 2010, Medifast was ranked number 1 on Forbes magazine’s list of “America’s 100 Best Small Companies”. The company was ranked 18th of the 2014 list. Read More…

Robert Lustig

Robert H. Lustig (born 1957) is an American pediatric endocrinologist. He is Professor of Pediatrics in the Division of Endocrinology at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), where he specializes in neuroendocrinology and childhood obesity. He is also director of the UCSF’s WATCH program, and president and co-founder of the non-profit Institute for Responsible Nutrition. Lustig came to public attention in 2009 when one of his medical reads, “Sugar: The Bitter Truth,” went viral on YouTube. He is the editor of Obesity Before Birth: Maternal and Prenatal Influences on the Offspring (2010), and author of Fat Chance: Beating the Odds Against Sugar, Processed Food, Obesity, and Disease (2013). Read More…

Breyers

Breyers is a brand of frozen desserts sold in the United States of America and owned by Unilever. The company was first founded in 1866 by William A. Breyer who sold his ice cream on his horse and wagon in the streets of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

In 1866, William A. Breyer began to produce and sell in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, first from his home, and later via horse and wagon on the streets. Breyer’s his Henry, incorporated the business in 1908. The formerly independent Breyer Ice Cream Company was sold to the National Dairy Products Corporation in 1926. National Dairy then changed its name to Kraftco in 1969, and Kraft by 1975. Kraft sold its ice cream brands to Unilever in 1993, while retaining the rights for the yogurt products. Read More…

Fat Head

Fat Head is a 2009 American documentary film directed by and starring Tom Naughton. Super Size Me and the lipid hypothesis, a theory of nutrition started in the early 1950s in the United States by Ancel Keys and promoted in much of the Western world.

Naughton first saw Super Size Me, part of his research on a comedy part of my research. I’m so much, I’m not sure, but I’m not sure if I know some other moviemakers went to McDiets, and they were not funny. the cure for contempt is counter-contempt, then the cure for a funny documentary that’s full of bologna is a funny documentary that is not. ” In 2013, Naughton released a director’s cut of Fat Head on DVD. It includes some slight re-edits, a section at the end of the news in the history of the film, and Naughton detailing his family Read More…

Richard K. Bernstein

Richard K. Bernstein (born June 17, 1934) is a physician and advocate for a low-carbohydrate diabetes diet to help achieve normal blood sugars for diabetics. Bernstein has type 1 diabetes. His private medical practice in Mamaroneck, New York is dedicated to treating diabetes and prediabetes. He is a fellow of the American College of Nutrition, the American College of Endocrinology and The College of Certified Wound Specialists. He is the author of six books on diabetes and normalizing blood sugars.

He was born in New York City in 1934. In 1946, at the age of twelve, Bernstein developed type 1 diabetes. For more than two decades, Bernstein was what he calls, “an ordinary diabetic” -one who dutifully followed doctor’s orders. Despite his diligence coping with the condition, the complications of his diabetes worsened over the years, by the time of Bernstein reached his thirties, many of his body systems had begun to deteriorate. Read More…

Richard K. Bernstein

Richard K. Bernstein (born June 17, 1934) is a physician and advocate for a low-carbohydrate diabetes diet to help achieve normal blood sugars for diabetics. Bernstein has type 1 diabetes. His private medical practice in Mamaroneck, New York is dedicated to treating diabetes and prediabetes. He is a fellow of the American College of Nutrition, the American College of Endocrinology and The College of Certified Wound Specialists. He is the author of six books on diabetes and normalizing blood sugars.

He was born in New York City in 1934. In 1946, at the age of twelve, Bernstein developed type 1 diabetes. For more than two decades, Bernstein was what he calls, “an ordinary diabetic” -one who dutifully followed doctor’s orders. Despite his diligence coping with the condition, the complications of his diabetes worsened over the years, by the time of Bernstein reached his thirties, many of his body systems had begun to deteriorate. Read More…

William Banting

William Banting (December 1796 – March 16, 1878) was a notable English undertaker. Formerly obese, it is also known to be a popular weight loss diet based on the intake of carbohydrates, especially those of a starchy or sugary nature. He undertook his dietary changes at the suggestion of Soho Square physician Dr. William Harvey, who in turn had learned of this type of diet, but in the context of diabetes management.

In the early 19th century, the William Banting family of St. James’s Street, London, was among the most prominent companies in the United States. As the Royal Household itself, the Banting family conducted the funerals of King George III in 1820, King George IV in 1830, the Duke of Gloucester in 1834, the Duke of Wellington in 1852, Prince Albert in 1861, Prince Leopold in 1884, Queen Victoria in 1901, and King Edward VII in 1910. The royal undertaking warrants for the Banting family ended in 1928 with the retirement of William Westport Banting. Read More…

Robert Atkins (nutritionist)

” ‘Dr. Robert Coleman Atkins’ ” (October 17, 1930 April 17, 2003) was an American physician and cardiologist, best known for the “Atkins Diet”, a diet that requires close control of carbohydrate consumption, emphasizing protein and fat as primary sources of dietary calories in addition to a controlled number of carbohydrates from vegetables. The commercial success of Atkins’ diet plan led to the most influential people in 2002. Read More…

Atkins Nutritionals

Atkins Nutritionals, Inc. was founded by Robert Atkins in order to promote the low-carbohydrate packaged foods of the Atkins diet. Currently it is owned by Roark Capital Group.

Atkins Founded Atkins Nutritionals, Inc. in 1989 to promote the low-carbohydrate products of its popular atkins diet. This diet was developed after Atkins read a research paper in the Journal of the American Medical Association. The paper, entitled “Weight Reduction,” was published by Alfred W. Pennington in 1958. Atkins used information from the study to resolve his own overweight condition. In October 2003 Parthenon Capital LLC and Goldman Sachs both acquired stakes in the company. Following the death of its founder in 2003, the Atkins Nutritionals Inc. report, citing losses of $ 340 million. The company emerged from bankruptcy in 2007 owned by North Castle Partners, with a focus on marketing the low-carbohydrate aspect of its products and an attempt to emphasize the overall nutritional value of its line of foods. It now has a business strategy concentrating on sales of nutrition bars and shakes. Roark Capital Group bought the company in 2010. Under Roaming it has been stabilized and it has been broken down into two types of private equity firms. In February 2015 it was reported that no material ever materialized. Under Roaming it has been stabilized and it has been broken down into two types of private equity firms. In February 2015 it was reported that no material ever materialized. Under Roaming it has been stabilized and it has been broken down into two types of private equity firms. In February 2015 it was reported that no material ever materialized. Read More…

Sugar Busters!

The Sugar Busters is a diet focused on eliminating foods with refined carbohydrates such as refined sugar, white flour, and white rice, as well as naturally occurring carbohydrates. Sugar Busters was created by H. Leighton Steward, Sam S. Andrews, Morrison C. Bethea, and Luis A. Balart. The diet is classified as a diet and compares with those of other low-calorie diets. The original ” Sugar Busters! Cut Sugar to Trim Fat ” was self-published by the authors in 1995 and became a local hit in their hometown of New Orleans, after which Ballantine Books republished the book nationally. The Ballantine edition hit # 1 on the New York Times bestseller list in June 2001. An updated ” The New Sugar Busters! Cut Sugar to Trim Fat ” was published in 2003. Read More…

Stillman diet

The Doctor’s Quick Weight Loss Diet (The Stillman Diet) was created by Irwin Maxwell Stillman, M.D., in 1967.

The diet includes lean beef, veal, chicken, turkey, fish, eggs and non-fat cottage cheese. Spices, tabasco sauce, herbs, salt, and pepper are also allowed. Condiments, butter, dressings and any kind of fat or oil are not permitted. Tea, coffee, and non-caloric soft drinks can be consumed, but only in addition to the 8 daily glasses of water required. It’s also recommended that dieters eat 6 small meals per day instead of 3 large ones.[1]

The diet is a carbohydrate restriction diet, similar to the Atkins Diet, although Stillman published his diet book 5 years before Atkins. Read More…

Sensa (diet)

Alan Hirsch, an American neurologist and psychiatrist. The product lacks scientific evidence and the subject of controversy and lawsuits. Following a $ 26 million fine by the US Federal Trade Commission in 2014, the company ceased operations.

According to the sensa diet, you can eat your favorite foods without counting calories, deprivation, or cravings. Sensa crystals, and that will result in weight-loss. These “Sensa crystals” were developed by Alan Hirsch, MD, the founder and neurologist of the Smell and Taste Treatment and Research Foundation in Chicago. The Sensa crystals (or “tastants”) are said to promote feelings of fullness and, ultimately, weight loss. If a person sticks with Sensa, the website claims that a person could lose 30 pounds in six months. Read More…

Master Cleanse

Master Cleanse is a modified juice that allows for no food, substituting tea and lemonade made with maple syrup and cayenne pepper. Proponents claim that the diet detoxifies the body and removes excess fat. There is no scientific evidence that the diet removes any toxins, or that it achieves anything beyond temporary weight loss. Uncertain to be harmful, Master Cleanse and similar programs can be harmful over the long term. In addition to its beneficial effects, short-term side effects may include fatigue, nausea, dizziness, and dehydration, while long term harm includes loss of muscle mass and increased risk of heart attack.

Master Cleanse was developed by Stanley Burroughs, who published it in the 1940s, and revived it in 1976 in his book The Master Cleanser and Healing for the Age of Enlightenment. Read More…

The Cambridge Diet

The Cambridge Diet is a diet in which 600 to 1500 calories are consumed per day, mainly in the diet. These products are made in the UK and include shakes, meal replacement bars, soups and smoothies.

The Cambridge Diet was developed in 1970 by Dr. Alan Howard at Cambridge University, England. It was launched as a commercial product in the United States in 1980. The Diet was very popular in America but was also the subject of some controversy. It was decided that the regulators and health authorities were affected. In the UK, the Cambridge Diet was launched in 1984. In 1986 the Diet was reformulated to adhere to recommendations made by the Commission on Medical Aspects (COMA) The Cambridge Diet is categorized as a very low-calorie diet, starting as low as 415 calories / day, and as a fad diet. The British Dietetic Association list the possible adverse side effects as “bad breath, dry mouth, tiredness, dizziness, insomnia, nausea and constipation”,

Cabbage soup diet

The cabbage soup is a radical weight loss diet designed around a low-calorie low calorie diet. It is generally considered a fad diet, in which it is designed for short-term weight-loss and requires no long-term commitment. The typical claim of the diet is to lose 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of weight in a week, though nutritional experts argue that it is almost impossible to lose that much fat in a week.

The origins of the diet are unknown, and it first gained popularity as a piece of fax in the 1980s. The diet has many names, usually linking the diet to a mainstream institution, including the “Sacred Heart Diet”, “Military Cabbage Soup”, “TJ Miracle Soup Diet”, and “Russian Peasant Diet”. All of the institutions have a relationship with the diet. As a general rule, the most important thing is that the dieter can consume as much as he wants. Read More…

Dave Asprey

Dave Asprey is an entrepreneur, businessman and author from Albuquerque, NM. He founded Bulletproof 360, Inc. in 2013 and founded Bulletproof Nutrition Inc. in 2014. Asprey is a “biohacker,” creator of “Bulletproof Coffee” and the “Bulletproof Diet”, and authored a book describing the diet. Asprey is also known for being the Internet for commerce, selling caffeine-molecule t-shirts via the alt.drugs.caplantin newsgroup in 1994. Previously, Asprey held executive and director positions for technology companies including Trend Micro, Blue Coat Systems and Citrix Systems. Read More…

The 4-Hour Body

The 4-Hour Body: An Uncommon Guide to Rapid Fat-Loss, Incredible Sex, and Superhuman Becoming is a nonfiction book by American writer Tim Ferriss. It was published by the Crown Publishing Group in 2010. It focuses on diet, with chapters on exercise, sleep, and sexual performance. The book is attracted to some controversy for its claims.

Ferriss said that he spent three years interviewing 200 people, from doctors to athletes to black-market drug salesmen, in preparing the book. The book advocates the ‘Slow-carb Diet’, which is characterized by three main points: eat a very simple set of meals repeatedly, focus on ‘slow carbs’, and allow one ‘cheat day’. The diet involves the elimination of starches and anything sweet, and a strong preference for lean protein and a few specific vegetables. Read More…

Thrive Cafe

HeartBeet Organic Superfoods Cafe is a restaurant in the Roosevelt neighborhood of Seattle, Washington in the United States. It is organic, vegan, gluten-free, and dairy-free. Its lunch and dinner offerings include a high-percentage of raw foods.

Thrive Cafe was opened on December 17, 2008 by Monika Kinsman, a Seattle native. It is currently in the process of raising funds to expand its business to several additional locations in the Puget Sound area. The name is registered by Minerva Organics LLC, a Washington State Limited Liability Company. In July 2012, the cafe was burglarized: the loss of computers and business equipment having a “significant impact” on the business, according to the owner. In 2013, Thrive hosted the “Fresh Film and Speaker Series” at Central Cinema. Read More…

Quality Assurance International

Quality Assurance International (QAI) is a US-based international organic certification company that is authorized by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) as “a USDA-accredited certifying agent that operates globally to certify organic operations to National Organic Standards Program.” It is a for-profit corporation, established in 1989, and headquartered in San Diego, California. It is one of the world’s largest certifiers, operating in the United States, Canada, Latin America, European Union, and Japan. It is owned by the public health and environmental organization NSF International.

QAI offers organic certification under the National Organic Program for agricultural producers, food processing facilities, integrated manufacturing operations, contract packing operations, traders, distributors, retailers, and consumers. Read More…

Carol Kicinski

Carol Kicinski is a gluten-free advocate, TV chief, founder and editor-in-chief magazine, gluten-free recipe developer, cookbook author, and food writer. She is the founder of Simply Gluten Free Omnimedia, Inc. Kicinski is also the founder and editor-in-chief of Simply Gluten Free magazine. She is in her seventh season with monthly episodes as a gluten-free TV chef on Daytime, a nationally syndicated morning television show produced by NBC-based WFLA-Tampa Bay. She has been gluten-free for more than 20 years. Read More…

Salma Hage

Salma Hage (born 8 January 1942) is a Lebanese author and cook. She is the author of the bestselling cookbook The Lebanese Kitchen. Her second book The Middle Eastern Vegetarian Cookbook won the James Beard Award in the Vegetable Cooking category.

Salma was born in Mazraat El Toufah in northern Lebanon in 1942. Her father was a Maronite priest, and she was the eldest of 12 children, learning cookery skills from her grandmother. Read More…

Gluten-free, casein-free diet

Gluten-free casein-free diet (GFCF diet), also known as gluten-free dairy-free diet (GFDF diet), is a diet that does not include the gluten proteins (found most often in wheat, barley, and rye), and casein (found most often in milk and dairy products). In spite of the absence of scientific evidence, there have been advocates for the use of this diet as a treatment for autism and related conditions.

The majority of the evidence does not support the use of this diet in the treatment of autism. Read More…

Gluten Free Ebola

“Gluten Free Ebola” is the second episode in the eighteenth season of the South Park American animated television series. The 249th overall episode, it was written and directed by Trey Parker. The episode premiered on Comedy Central in the United States on October 1, 2014. The episode of the diet and the trend of gluten-free diet and diet. Read More…

Gluten-free beer

Gluten-free beer is made from ingredients that do not contain gluten such as millet, rice, sorghums, buckwheat or corn (maize). People who have gluten intolerance (including celiac disease and dermatitis herpetiformis sufferers) have a reaction to certain proteins in the grains commonly used to make beer, barley and wheat. The hordein found in barley and the gliadin found in wheat are types of gluten that can trigger symptoms of these diseases. Gluten-free beer is part of a gluten-free diet.

Gluten can be found in many common cereal grains including barley and wheat. Even in small quantities, the glutens specifically from barley and wheat (hordein and gliadin respectively) can trigger severe symptoms in those who suffer from Celiac disease. Almost all beer contains levels of gluten that can not be tolerated by those with the disease, but a growing number of people who can not tolerate the glycoproteins. Read More…

Banana pasta

Banana pasta is a type of pasta prepared with banana as a primary ingredient. The product is typically made with unripe, green bananas that are dried and then milled into banana flour. Banana pasta is a gluten-free food. The product can be dried for later cooking or can be cooked immediately after preparation. Pasta Banana is cooked like pasta standard, typically by boiling it. A study found that banana pasta has a higher water absorption rate compared to standard pasta, which generates higher yields after cooking. In 2012, the University of Brasília found that it may be useful for those with celiac disease, and that compared to whole wheat pasta, which is lower in calories and fat, higher in protein, and less expensive to produce. The product has also been introduced as a green bananas Read More…

Elana Amsterdam

Elana Amsterdam is the New York Times Bestselling author of “Paleo Cooking from Elana’s Pantry”. She writes cookbooks for gluten-free cooking, using almond flour and coconut flour as a gluten-free alternative to wheat flour. Her book, The Gluten-Free Almond Flour Cookbook, was named one of the “Best Cookbooks of 2009” by The Denver Post. Amsterdam has partnered with the California Almond Board in conjunction with her works. Her blog, elanaspantry.com, was named one of the top 50 food blogs by Cision. Contributed by Jonathan Hunt to The Hunt and Jonathan Hunt. Amsterdam was added to New York Crafts Business 40 under 40 in 1998.

In November 2006 Amsterdam started Elana’s Pantry, a go-to website for healthy, gluten-free, grain-free, paleo recipes and lifestyle tips. Read More…

Wednesday

Wednesday is the day of the week between Tuesday and Thursday. According to international standard ISO 8601 it is the third day of the week. In countries that use the Sunday-first convention, and in the Jewish Hebrew calendar Wednesday is defined as the fourth day of the week. The name is derived from Old English Wōdnesdæg and Middle English Wednesdei, “day of Woden”, reflecting the pre-Christian religion practiced by the Anglo-Saxons. In other languages, such as the Wednesday or Italian mercoledì, the day is a layer of dies Mercurii “day of Mercury”. It has the most letters out of all the Gregorian calendar days. Wednesday is in the middle of the day of the Western five-day workweek that starts on Monday and finishes on Friday. Read More…

Water fasting

Water fasting is a type of fasting in which the practitioner consumes only water. One may water fast for a variety of reasons, including medical and religious requirements.

Jains maintain a strict water-only fast for 8-10 (digambar & Swetambar) days, during the days of Paryushan. Read More…

Sallekhana

Hallkhana (IAST:), also known as Samlehna, Santhara, Samadhi-marana or Sanyasana-marana; is a supplementary vow to the ethical code of conduct of Jainism. It is the religious practice of voluntarily fasting to death by the diet of food and liquids. It is viewed in Jainism as the thinning of human passions and the body, and another means of destroying rebirth-influencing karma by withdrawing all physical and mental activities. It is not considered a suicide by Jain scholars because it is not an act of passion, nor does it deploy poisons or weapons. After the roomkhana vow, the ritual preparation and practice can extend into years. Sallekhana is a vow Jain ascetics and householders. These are some of the most important things in the world, including queens, in Jain history. However, in the modern era, death through hall has been a relatively uncommon event. There is debate about the practice from a right to life and a freedom of religion viewpoint. In 2015, the Rajasthan High Court banned the practice, considering it suicide. Later that year, the Supreme Court of India stayed at the Rajasthan High Court and lifted the ban on Hallkhana. Read More…

Ocsober

Ocsober is an Australian fundraising initiative that encourages people to give up alcohol for the month of October. The money raised by voluntary participants goes to Life Education Australia, the organization behind the educational mascot, Healthy Harold. For over 30 years, the well-known giraffe has been teaching. During 2014, Ocsober reached $ 1,000,000 to help Life Education Australia and Healthy. Ocsober is also used as an opportunity to highlight the growing danger of binge drinking and alcohol abuse, particularly among young Australians. The statistics provided by Life Education estimates that 3,200 Australians die as a result of excessive alcohol consumption each year, while 81,000 end up in hospitals for the same reason. The organization behind this initiative is also hoping to promote more permanent changes to the Australian drinking habits. Participants will not only help a good cause, but also help you to improve your chances of success. Read More…

Nineteen-Day Fast

The Nineteen-Day Fast is a nineteen-day period of the year, during which members of the Bahá’í Faith adhere to a sunrise-to-sunset fast. Along with obligatory prayer, it is one of the greatest obligations of a Bahá’í, and its chief purpose is spiritual; to reinvigorate the soul and bring closer to God. The fast was instituted by the Bab, and accepted by Bahá’u’lláh, the founder of the Bahá’í Faith, who stated its rules in his book of laws, the Kitáb-i-Aqdas. The nineteen days of fasting occur immediately before the beginning of the Bahá’í New Year, on the vernal equinox (around March 1/2 to March 19/20).

The Báb, the founder of the Bábí Faith, published the Persian Bayán, and stated that the last month would be a period of fasting. The Báb stated that the true meaning of the fast was abstaining from all except the love of the Messengers from God. The Báb also stated that the continuation of the contingent of the approval of a messianic figure, Him Whom God Shall Make Manifest. Bahá’u’lláh, the founder of the Bahá’í Faith, who claims to be a foretold by the Báb, accepted the fast, but altered many of its details and regulations. The Bahá’í fast sets fasting practices of several other religions. Lent is a period of fasting for Christians, Yom Kippur and many other holidays for Jews, and the fast of Ramadan is practiced by Muslims. The Bahá ‘ Read More…

Minnesota Starvation Experiment

The Minnesota Starvation Experiment, also known as the Minnesota Semi-Starvation Experiment, the Minnesota Starvation-Recovery Experiment and the Starvation Study, was a clinical study performed at the University of Minnesota between November 19, 1944 and December 20, 1945. The investigation was The effects of severe dietary restrictions on the physiological and psychological effects of severe dietary restriction. The motivation of the study was twofold: first, to produce a definitive treatise on the subject of human starvation based on a laboratory simulation of severe famine and, second, to use the scientific results and Asia at the end of World War II. It was recognized early in 1944 that millions of people were in grave danger of mass starvation as a result of the conflict, and the information was needed regarding the effects of semi-starvation and the impact of various rehabilitation strategies-if postwar relief efforts were be effective. The study was developed in collaboration with the Civilian Public Service (CPS) and the Selective Service System and used by CPS volunteers. The study was divided into three phases: A twelve-week control phase, where physiological and psychological observations were collected to establish a baseline for each subject; a 24-week starvation phase, during which the caloric intake of each subject was drastically reduced-causing each participant to lose an average of 25% of their pre-starvation body weight; and finally a recovery phase, in which various rehabilitative diets have been tried to re-nourish the volunteers. Two subjects were dismissed for failing to maintain the dietary restrictions during the early phase of the experiment, and the data for two others were used in the analysis of the results. In 1950, Ancel Keys and his colleagues published the results of the Minnesota Starvation Experiment in a two-volume, 1.385 page text entitled The Biology of Human Starvation (University of Minnesota Press). While this is a very important step in the past, it has had a significant impact on the postwar recovery efforts, which have been produced and used extensively by the United States. in which various rehabilitative diets were tried to re-nourish the volunteers. Two subjects were dismissed for failing to maintain the dietary restrictions during the early phase of the experiment, and the data for two others were used in the analysis of the results. In 1950, Ancel Keys and his colleagues published the results of the Minnesota Starvation Experiment in a two-volume, 1.385 page text entitled The Biology of Human Starvation (University of Minnesota Press). While this is a very important step in the past, it has had a significant impact on the postwar recovery efforts, which have been produced and used extensively by the United States. in which various rehabilitative diets were tried to re-nourish the volunteers. Two subjects were dismissed for failing to maintain the dietary restrictions during the early phase of the experiment, and the data for two others were used in the analysis of the results. In 1950, Ancel Keys and his colleagues published the results of the Minnesota Starvation Experiment in a two-volume, 1.385 page text entitled The Biology of Human Starvation (University of Minnesota Press). While this is a very important step in the past, it has had a significant impact on the postwar recovery efforts, which have been produced and used extensively by the United States. Two subjects were dismissed for failing to maintain the dietary restrictions during the early phase of the experiment, and the data for two others were used in the analysis of the results. In 1950, Ancel Keys and his colleagues published the results of the Minnesota Starvation Experiment in a two-volume, 1.385 page text entitled The Biology of Human Starvation (University of Minnesota Press). While this is a very important step in the past, it has had a significant impact on the postwar recovery efforts, which have been produced and used extensively by the United States. Two subjects were dismissed for failing to maintain the dietary restrictions during the early phase of the experiment, and the data for two others were used in the analysis of the results. In 1950, Ancel Keys and his colleagues published the results of the Minnesota Starvation Experiment in a two-volume, 1.385 page text entitled The Biology of Human Starvation (University of Minnesota Press). While this is a very important step in the past, it has had a significant impact on the postwar recovery efforts, which have been produced and used extensively by the United States. and the data for two others were not used in the analysis of the results. In 1950, Ancel Keys and his colleagues published the results of the Minnesota Starvation Experiment in a two-volume, 1.385 page text entitled The Biology of Human Starvation (University of Minnesota Press). While this is a very important step in the past, it has had a significant impact on the postwar recovery efforts, which have been produced and used extensively by the United States. and the data for two others were not used in the analysis of the results. In 1950, Ancel Keys and his colleagues published the results of the Minnesota Starvation Experiment in a two-volume, 1.385 page text entitled The Biology of Human Starvation (University of Minnesota Press). While this is a very important step in the past, it has had a significant impact on the postwar recovery efforts, which have been produced and used extensively by the United States. Read More…

Juice fasting

Juice fasting, also known as juice cleansing, is a fad diet in which a person consumes only fruit and vegetable juices while otherwise abstaining from food consumption. It is used for a detoxification of alternative medicine and is often part of detox diets. This page is sponsored with implausible and unvidenced claims for its health benefits.

Juice fasting is closely associated with detox. Catherine Collins, Chief Dietician of St. George’s Hospital Medical School in London, England, states that “The concept of ‘detox’ is a marketing myth rather than a physiological entity.The idea that an avalanche of vitamins, minerals, and laxatives taken over a 2 to 7 day period can have a long-lasting benefit for the body is also a marketing myth. ” Detox diets, depending on the type and duration, are seen as dangerous and can cause various types of muscle loss and unhealthy re-gaining fat after detox ends. Juice mixes with grapefruit juice may also adversely interact with certain prescription drugs. Read More…

Prahlad Jani

Prahlad Jani (), also known as “Mataji”, (born Chunriwala Mataji, August 13, 1929) is an Indian breatharian sadhu who claims to have lived without food and water since 1940. He says that the goddess Amba sustains him.

Born Chunriwala Mataji, Jani grew up in Charada village in Mehsana district. According to Jani, he left his home in Rajasthan at the age of seven, and went to live in the jungle. At the age of 11, Jani underwent a religious experience and became a follower of the Hindu goddess Amba. From that time, he is a devotee of Amba, wearing a red sari-like garment, a jewelery and crimson flowers in his shoulder-length hair. Is known as Mataji (“[manifestation of] The Great Mother”). Jani believes that the goddess provides him a liquid sustenance or water which drops through a hole in his palate, allowing him to live without food or drink. Since the 1970s, Jani has lived in a cave in the rainforest near the Gujarati temple of Ambaji, Read More…

Hunger strike

A hunger strike is a method of nonvoluntary resistance or pressure in which participants have an active role in political protest, or to provoke feelings of guilt in others, usually with the objective to achieve a specific goal, such as a policy change. Most hunger strikers will take liquids but not solid food. In cases where an entity (usually the state) has the ability to obtain custody of the hunger striker (such as a prisoner), the hunger strike is often terminated by the custodial entity through the use of force-feeding. Read More…

Linda Hazzard

Linda Burfield Hazzard (December 18, 1867 – June 24, 1938) was an American quack doctor noted for her promotion of fasting as a treatment; She was imprisoned by the state of Washington for a number of the results of this disease. She was born 1867 in Carver County, Minnesota, and died during a fast in 1938. Read More…

Valter Longo

Valter D. Longo (born October 9, 1967) is an Italian-American biogerontologist and cell biologist known for his studies on the role of fasting and nutrient response. mechanisms in many eukaryotes. He is currently a professor at the USC Davis School of Gerontology with a position in the Department of Biological Sciences and the USC Longevity Institute.

Originally from Genoa, Italy, Valter Longo attended the University of North Texas majoring in Biochemistry. In 1992 he joined the laboratory of “calorie restriction” pioneer Roy Walford at UCLA where he studied calorie restriction and aging of the immune system. He completed his PhD work in Biochemistry studying antioxidant enzymes and anti-aging genes under Joan Valentine at UCLA in 1997 and his postdoctoral training in the neurobiology of Alzheimer’s Disease under Caleb Finch at the University of Southern California. Since 1997 he has been a faculty member at the USC Davis School of Gerontology and Ethel Percy Andrus Gerontology Center. Longo is a member of the USC’s Biology of Aging program as well as the director of the USC Longevity Institute, also launched the USC Davis School of Gerontology. s first study-abroad program, a summer class in the nutrition and genetics of aging in Italy. In 2011, he was profiled on the Wormhole with Morgan Freeman for his longevity-related research. Read More…

Fasting in Jainism

Fasting is very common among Jains and as a part of festivals. Most days at special times, during festivals, and on holy days. Paryushan is the most prominent festival, lasting eight days in Svetambara Jain tradition and ten days in Digambar Jain tradition during the monsoon. The monsoon is a time of fasting. However, Jain may be at any time, especially if he or she feels guilty. Variations in fasts encourages Jains to do whatever they can to maintain whatever self control is possible for the individual. According to Jain texts, deep concentration is fasting (upavāsa).

Fasting can be done to both the body and mind fasts are also done as a penalty. Read More…

Fasting in Islam

Fasting in Islam, known as Sawm () or Siyām (), the Arabic words for fasting, also known as Rūzeh or Rōzah () in some Muslim countries, is the practice of abstaining, usually from food and drink. The observance of Sawm during the Islamic holy month of Ramadan is the fourth of the Five Pillars of Islam, but it is not only about that month.

Literally meaning “to abstain,” ṣawm is a semitic cognate to ṣawmā, “ṣōm”, and “ṣom”.

The Muslims of Central Asia, Afghanistan, India, Iran, Bangladesh, Pakistan and Turkey uses the words roza / rozha / roja / oruç, which comes from Persian. While the Malay community in Malaysia, Brunei and Singapore call it puasa, which is derived from Sanskrit, upvaasa, puasa is also used in Indonesia, Southern Thailand and Southern Philippines. Read More…

Fast day

Fast Day was a holiday observed in the United States between 1670 and 1991. “A day of public fasting and prayer,” it was traditionally observed in the New England states. It was early in the early days of the American colonies by Royal Governors, often before the spring planting (see Rogation Days). It was observed by church attendance, fasting, and abstinence from secular activities. The earliest known day was proclaimed in Boston on September 8, 1670. Fast day had lost its significance as a religious holiday by the late 19th century. It was abolished by Massachusetts in 1894 (being replaced with Patriots ‘Day) and shortly thereafter by Maine, which also adopted Patriots’ Day. It continued in New Hampshire until 1991, signifying only the opening of the summer tourist season; 1991, and then in 1999, Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. Read More…

Edward H. Dewey

Edward Hooker Dewey (21 May 1837 – 21 December 1904), best known as Edward H. Dewey was an American physician. He was a pioneer of therapeutic fasting and the inventor of the “No Breakfast Plan”.

Dewey graduated from the College of Medicine and Surgery of the University of Michigan in 1864 with a medical degree, and became an assistant surgeon in the Army of the United States. From 1866 he started to work in Meadville, Pennsylvania. Dewey’s The True Science of Living (1895) had been reprinted at least four times by 1908. His Sequel The No-Breakfast Plan and the Fasting Cure (1900) was very successful with the public. By 1921 it had gone through three editions and was translated into French and German. Dewey argued for people to completely abstain from breakfast, and only consume two meals per day. He attributed all diseases and physiological problems to excessive eating. He advocated long fasts and believed that abstinence from food could cure insanity and mental disorders. Dewey was a protestant and affirmed harmony of his ” Read More…

Dharna

A Dharna is a non-violent sit-in protest, which may include a lot of work. , in India, a way of obtaining compliance with a claim for justice, or a payment of a debt. Mahatma Gandhi’s satyagraha form of civil disobedience and protest. In India, there is a place for conducting Dharna, and a permission is required for it. Often, those practicing dharna break leading permission to clash with law enforcement. Dharnah refers to fixing one’s mind on an object. It refers to whole-heartedly pledging to an outcome or to inculcating a directed attitude. Dharna is consciously and diligently holding a point of view. The word originates from the Sanskrit word dharnam. In Pakistan, the term was first used in 1958 by Abdul Qayyum Khan against the Prime Minister Feroze Khan’s administration to remove his President Iskander Mirza but its effective use was made by Naeem Siddiqui Ahmed and Jammat e Islami organized in Pakistan in 1993, Imran Khan, Dr. Tahir ul Qadri and other political and religious leaders are now attempting to use this strategy for their purposes.
Read More…

Dry January

Dry January is a public health campaign urging people to abstain from alcohol for the month of January, particularly practiced in the United Kingdom. The campaign, as a formal entity, appears to be relatively recent, but in the last year of the year, the Suiser January 1942 as part of its war effort. The term “Dry January” was registered by the charity Alcohol Concern in mid-2014; The first ever Alcohol Concern partnered with Public Health England. In January 2014, 17,000 Britons stopped drinking for that month. Read More…

Ella Woodward

Eleanor Laura Davan Mills (born May 31, 1991) is a British food writer and entrepreneur under the Deliciously Ella brand. She was an advocate of cleanliness and self-sufficiency. Her clean eating series of books was called by The Guardian “arguably the most successful fad diet cookbook series in recent years”.

Woodward was born on 31 May 1991 in Rugby, Warwickshire, England, the daughter of the politician Shaun Woodward and his wife Camilla, daughter of politician Tim Sainsbury and granddaughter of Lord Sainsbury, of the Sainsbury’s supermarket owning family. After attending Rugby School, she graduated with a degree in history from the University of St Andrews in 2013. In April 2016 she married Tessa Jowell’s son, Matthew Mills, who is also her business partner. Read More…

Natasha Corrett

Natasha Corrett (born July 1983) is a British vegetarian chef and food writer, and advocate of clean eating and alkaline eating principles.

Natasha Corrett was born in July 1983 to the interior designer Kelly Hoppen and her first husband Graham Corrett. She is married to Simon Bateman. Read More…

Clean eating

Clean eating is one of the most important ingredients in the diet. Variations on the diet may also exclude gluten, grains, and dairy products and the consumption of raw food. Ella Mills, Natasha Corrett, and the Hemsley sisters; More by Mills and the Hemsley sisters had distanced themselves from the phrase and said they never used it.

The idea of ​​clean eating has been criticized as lacking scientific evidence for its claims, and in extreme cases. It has been claimed that it has been modified to prevent illness and to provide a better diet. Other criticisms have said various diseases are linked to clean eating, such as osteoporosis and “orthorexia nervosa”. Other health risks include food poisoning and diseases from parasites. Read More…

The Weight-Loss Cure “They” Don’t Want You to Know About

‘The Weight Loss Cure “They” Do not Want You to Know About Kevin Trudeau. It was released in April 2007 by Alliance Publishing. Trudeau has been convicted of felonies and fined by the Federal Trade Commission for making fraudulent claims in relation to the book, in part because of medical advice. The book repeats a hypothalamus activity in the hypothalamus, linked to the pituitary gland, with the intention to control and control of fat cells, by using herbal supplements and repeated use of the hormone hCG; This claim was originally made by Albert TW Simeons in the 1950s. Simeons’ Results are not reproduced by other companies and do not include the following in their entirety: The book follows up on two other bestselling but critically panned books, “Natural Cures” They “Don” ‘t Want You to Know About and More Natural Cures Revealed: Previously Censored Brand Name Products That Cure Disease’ ‘. Weight Loss Cure has appeared on the bestseller’s lists of the Wall Street Journal, USA Today, Publishers Weekly, and The New York Times. Previously Censored Brand Name Products That Cure Disease ”. Weight Loss Cure has appeared on the bestseller’s lists of the Wall Street Journal, USA Today, Publishers Weekly, and The New York Times. Previously Censored Brand Name Products That Cure Disease ”. Weight Loss Cure has appeared on the bestseller’s lists of the Wall Street Journal, USA Today, Publishers Weekly, and The New York Times. Read More…

Waistland

Waistland: The R / evolutionary Behind Our Weight and Fitness Crisis is a book by Harvard psychologist Deirdre Barrett published by WW Norton & Company in 2007. The book examines the obesity and fitness crisis from an evolutionary standpoint. Barrett argues that our bodies, our metabolisms, and our feeding instincts were designed during the evolutionary hunter-gatherer phase. We are programmed to drill for sugar and saturated fats because they have been found in fruit and game. Now, these same foods are everywhere-in vending machines, fast food joints, restaurants, grocery stores, and cafeterias-they’re nearly impossible to avoid. This article describes the subject of “supernormal stimuli” -the concept of artificial creations that appeal to our instincts than the natural objects they mimic-supernormal stimuli for appetite to the obesity epidemic. The book opens with a thumbnail about how zoos post signs saying “Do not Feed the Animals.” People respect these orders, allowing veterinarians to prescribe just the right balanced diet for the lions, koalas, and snakes. Meanwhile, everyone stops for chips, sodas, and hot dogs on the way out of the zoo. The book explores solutions from behavior to change diet and exercise habits. One of the main messages of the book is that big changes in diet, that the addictive nature of junk food means that, after a few days, Read More…

South Beach Diet

The South Beach Diet is a popular fad diet developed by Arthur Agatston and promoted in a best-selling 2003 book. It emphasizes eating high-fiber, low-glycemic carbohydrates, unsaturated fats, and lean protein, and categorizes carbohydrates and fats as “good” or “bad”. Like other fad diets, it does not exist

The diet has three stages, and increases the proportion of carbohydrate consumed as it progresses while simultaneously decreasing the proportions of fat and protein. It includes a number of recommended foods such as lean meats and vegetables, and has a concept of “good” (mostly monounsaturated) fats. It makes no restriction on calorie intake, includes an exercise program, and is based on taking meals and two snacks per day. The first stage of the diet (13 lbs in two weeks). According to the UK’s National Health Service (NHS), the severity of the first stage of the diet may result in the loss of some vitamins, minerals and fiber. The NHS reports that dietary restrictions can be difficult because of bad breath, dry mouth, tiredness, dizziness, insomnia, Read More…

Skinny Bitch

Skinny Bitch is a diet book written by Rory Freedman and model training model Kim Barnouin. The book sold better than expected despite not having high initial sales. Skinny Bitch became a bestseller in the United Kingdom by May 2007 and in the United States by July, more than eighteen months after its initial 2005 press run of 10,000 copies. The book also sold well in Canada.

The book advocates a pure vegan diet and includes sections on cruelty. In addition to advocating a vegan diet, the authors also say that they should avoid smoking, alcohol, caffeine, chemical additives (such as aspartame) and refined sugar. Sources are frequently cited throughout the book, a large number of which point to vegan websites. Some sources that are mentioned often in the literature. Read More…

Shrink Yourself

Shrink Yourself (2007) is a book on emotional eating by Roger Gould. In Shrink Yourself, Gould suggests that the powerlessness of people is more important than anything else. By recovering one’s power in five key areas, Gould also suggests recov- ering power over food cravings. The five areas he identified are: Read More…

The Shangri-La Diet

The Seth Roberts, a professor at Tsinghua University and a professor emeritus at UC Berkeley, and the name of the diet that the book advocates. The book discusses consuming 100-400 calories per day in a flavorless food as extra light olive oil one hour outside mealtimes as a method of appetite removal leading to weight loss.

As a graduate student, Roberts studied animal cognition, specifically rat psychology. As a psychology professor, Roberts read a report by Israel Ramirez, a scientist at the Monell Chemical Senses Center, about the effect of saccharin on the growth and weight of rats. Based on this research, he developed a new theory of weight control. The theory leads to a low glycemic index and to eat sushi many days in a row, which caused him to lose twenty pounds. In 2000, Roberts visited Paris. He noticed an extreme loss of appetite and speculated that this was not a problem. Read More…

Scarsdale diet

The Scarsdale Diet is a fad diet designed for weight loss created in the 1970s by Herman Tarnower, named for the town in New York where he practiced cardiology, described in the book “The Complete Scarsdale Medical Diet Plus Dr. Tarnower’s Lifetime Keep-Slim Program ”, which Tarnower wrote with an author of self-help books, Sam Sinclair Baker. The diet carries the risk of becoming infected with the disease. The diet is calling for high protein and low fat carbohydrates, but also emphasizes fruits and vegetables. The diet’s high fat ratio can increase the risk of heart disease. People following the diet can lose much weight at But this loss is generally better than with normal calorie restriction. The book was originally published in 1978 and received an unexpected boost from Herman Tarnower, was murdered in 1980 by his jilted lover Jean Harris. A made-for-tv movie, The People vs. Jean Harris, capitalized on the infamous murder, and was broadcast in 1981. Jean Harris was portrayed by Ellen Burstyn. Read More…

The New American Diet

The New American Diet (Rodale, 2009) is a diet book about the effects of “obesogens” on our bodies, and offers a prescriptive diet plan to reverse what they call “The Obesogen Effect.” Author Stephen Perrine (editor of ‘Children’s Health, editor-at-large of Men’s Health, and former editor-in-chief of Best Life) and co-author Heather Hurlock (formerly health editor of Best Life) research and discuss The link between obesogens and the American obesity crisis, as well as increases in rates of diabetes, depression, heart disease, declining birth rates and sperm counts, and autism. Obesogens have been described as natural and artificial endocrine-disrupting chemicals found in food and water supply. Read More…

John A. McDougall

John A. McDougall (born May 17, 1947) is an American physician and author who is the co-founder, chairman, and sole board member of San Francisco-based Dr. McDougall’s Right Foods Inc. advocating the consumption of low fat, starchy food. His diet-The McDougall Plan-is a fad diet that carries some possible disadvantages, such as a boring food choice and the risk of feeling hungry.

He was born on May 17, 1947. McDougall is a graduate of Michigan State University’s College of Human Medicine. He performed his internship at Queen’s Medical Center in Honolulu, Hawaii, in 1972 and his medical residency at the University of Hawaii. He is certified as an internist by the Board of Internal Medicine and the National Board of Medical Examiners. In 1965, at age 18, McDougall suffered a massive stroke, which he attributed to his high animal product diet. Between 1973 and 1976, McDougall worked as a physician at the Hamakua Sugar Plantation on Hawaii Island. Between 1986 and 2002, he launched a vegetarian dietary program at St. Helena Hospital in the Napa Valley, California. Between 1999 and 2001, he ran a dietary program for the Blue Cross Blue Shield Association in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Read More…

Mayo Clinic Diet

The Mayo Clinic is a diet book first published in 1949 by the Mayo Clinic Committee on dietetics and the Mayo Clinic diet manual. Prior to this, the association is not connected to the clinic. The book is now published on the Mayo Clinic diet () with a companion logbook, The Mayo Clinic diet diary () .The diet begins with a two-week period when five specific bad habits are replaced by five specific good habits. According to the authors this should result in a 6- to 10-pound (2.5- to 4.5 kg) loss during that 2-week period. The remainder of the program is based largely on a combination of portion control and exercise / activity. This part of the program is designed to give you the best value for your money, or 50 to 100 pounds (22 to 45 kg) over the course of a year. The program uses a food pyramid that has vegetables and fruits as its base. It puts carbohydrates, meat and dairy, fats, and sweets into the future. The diet emphasizes setting realistic goals, replacing poor health habits with good ones, and conscious portion control. Read More…

Fit for Life

Fit for Life (FFL) is a diet and lifestyle book series stemming from the principles of orthopathy. It is sponsored by the American authors Harvey and Marilyn Diamond. The Fit for Life book series recommends dietary principles in the morning, eating predominantly “live” and “high-water-content” food, and if eating animal protein to avoid combining it with complex carbohydrates. While the diet has been prepared by the dietitians and nutritionists, and the American Dietetic Association and the American Academy of Family Physicians list it as a fad diet. Read More…

Eat This, Not That

Eat This, Not That! (ETNT), is a media franchise owned and operated by co-author David Zinczenko. The original book series was developed from a ‘Men’s Health’ magazine written by David Zinczenko and Matt Goulding. It also includes a website, quarterly magazine, videos, e-books and downloadable PDFs. The franchise makes recommendations on how to improve your health. Criteria for unhealthy dishes center on high levels of calories, fat, saturated fat, fat trans, sodium and / or sugar content. The healthier alternatives often include higher levels of fiber and / or protein. The franchise brands itself as the “no-diet weight loss solution.” As of October 2012, the ETNT franchise has sold more than 8 million copies. An iPhone application ” Eat This, Not That! The Game ” Read More…

Dukan Diet

The Dukan Diet is a protein-based commercial fad diet devised by Pierre Dukan. Dukan has been promoting his diet for over 30 years; It gained a wider audience after the 2000 publication of his book, The Dukan Diet, which has sold more than 7 million copies globally. The book has been published in 32 languages ​​and published in 32 countries. The book was released in the United Kingdom in May 2010, and in the United States in April 2011. It is not clear the diet has any benefit and it carries risks to kidney and cardiovascular health. Read More…

Diet for a Small Planet

Diet for a Small Planet is a 1971 bestselling book by Frances Moore Lappé, the first major book to the global impact of meat production and wasteful contributor to global food scarcity. She argued for environmental vegetarianism – practicing a vegetarian lifestyle out of animal-based products and the production of animal-based products. The book has sold over three million copies and was groundbreaking for arguing that world hunger is not caused by a lack of food but by ineffective food policy. In addition to information on meat production and its impact on hunger, the book features simple rules for a healthy diet and hundreds of meat-free recipes. “Its mix of recipes and analysis typified radicals’ faith in the ability to combine personal therapy with political activism.” Read More…

Diet for a New America

Diet for a New America is a 1987 bestselling book by John Robbins. The book discusses vegetarianism, the environmental impact of factory farming and animal rights. In 1991 KCET, the Los Angeles Affiliate PBS, produced a documentary based film on the book called Diet for a New America: Your Health, Your Planet. The film is narrated by John Robbins and features interviews with Michael Klaper, T. Colin Campbell, and John A. McDougall. Read More…

Patricia Chuey

Patricia Chuey, MSc., RD, FDC, is a Canadian Registered Dietitian. In 2014 she was granted Fellowship in Dietitians of Canada and an Alumni of Influence Award from the University of Saskatchewan for promoting healthy eating and well-being in Canada. Her food and nutrition commentary appears in the Canadian media, such as Canadian Living Magazine, The Province Newspaper (Vancouver) and Wellness Matters Magazine Read More…

The Beck Diet Solution

The Beck Diet Solution, authored by Dr. Judith S. Beck, uses cognitive and behavioral techniques to teach them how to lose weight and continually motivate themselves to maintain their weight loss. It is one of the first books to apply Cognitive Therapy techniques to dieting and permanent weight loss. The Beck Diet Solution teaches dieters to change their behavior so that they can change their behavior for the long term. By following the Cognitive Therapy techniques, dieters learn to: think and overcome common dieting pitfalls and sabotaging thoughts; eat favorite foods while steadily losing weight, feel in control in the most challenging situations; feel confident in their ability to follow a healthy diet and exercise plan; stay motivated to maintain weight loss for life. Dr. Beck utilizes tools such as the monitoring of scales, daily schedule schedules, weight loss graphs, and motivational cards to facilitate the process. The foreword of the book was written by Judith Beck’s father, Dr. Aaron T. Beck, who is widely regarded as the father of cognitive therapy. Judith S. Beck, Ph.D., is the President of the Beck Institute for Cognitive Behavior Therapy and is internationally renowned in the field of Cognitive Behavior Therapy. She wrote the basic textbook, Cognitive Behavior Therapy: Basics and Beyond (2nd edition), which has been translated into 20 languages. Dr. Judith Beck also published The Beck Diet Solution Workout Weight Loss, the Complete Beck Diet for Life, Read More…

The 100-Mile Diet

The 100-Mile Diet: A Year of Local Eating is a non-fiction book written by Canadian writers Alisa Smith and JB MacKinnon. In the book, the authors recount their experiences, including motivations and challenges, on their diet, for one year, to include only foods grown within 100 miles of their residence. Beginning in March 2005, with little preparation, they were all within 100 miles. Finding little in grocery stores, they are located on local markets. Staples in their diet included seafood, chicken, root vegetable, berries, and corn. They lacked cooking oils, rice, and sugar. They are prepared in the winter with extra supplies. The first couple wrote about the experience in the online magazine The Tyee. The popularity of the articles led to a book deal. In the book, Smith and MacKinnon, each write alternate chapters, 12 in total. The first chapter is written by MacKinnon and focuses on the first month of their experience. They write in the first person as they explore their own dietary experiences and personal feelings. In the Canadian market, Maclean’s nonfiction bestseller list. 20 weeks on ‘The Vancouver Sun’s’ nonfiction bestseller list. The authors won the Roderick Haig-Brown Regional Prize from the British Columbia Booksellers Association for the best contribution to the enjoyment and understanding of British Columbia. The 100-mile diet concept, along with advocates of local food, were covered by media across North America. In 2009, Food Network Canada aired The 100 Mile Challenge, a television series co-created by MacKinnon and Smith and based on the book. Read More…

The 10% Solution for a Healthy Life

The 10% Solution for a Healthy Life (, paperback, 1993) is a health book written by computer scientist Raymond Kurzweil in which he explains to readers “How to Reduce Fat in Your Diet and Virtually Eliminate All Risk of Heart Disease and Cancer”. Fantastic Voyage: Live Long Enough to Live Forever and Transcend: Nine Steps to Living Well Forever. Read More…

The 8-Week Cholesterol Cure

The New 8-Week Cholesterol Cure is a 1987 health book by Robert Kowalski, who wrote it as a personal recollection about dealing with cholesterol issues. Kowalski wrote the book after having two coronary bypass surgeries and a heart attack. He created the program in the book after he made a change in his diet, and the book is sometimes credited with popularizing a health food. Kowalski published three other books in the 8-Week Cholesterol Cure series as well as The Blood Pressure Cure: 8 Weeks to Lower Blood Pressure with Prescription Drugs, which dealt with blood pressure. In October 1988 was filed by 16 plaintiffs against Kowalski and Harper & Row.

In the book Kowalski writes about his experiences with cholesterol and uses it to help recommend changes that they can use to improve their cholesterol. It includes information about cholesterol and what foods can eat to cholesterol, as well as vitamins can assist in this process. He also recommends exercise and emphasizes the use of niacin as a cure for cholesterol. Read More…

Zone diet

The Zone diet is a low carbohydrate diet developed by biochemist Barry Sears. It specifies balanced portions of carbohydrates and protein at every meal. It also makes it easier to follow.

One of the ideas on which diet is based on a sense of satiety will discourage overeating. Also, like other low-carb diets, the glycemic index is used to classify carbohydrates. Both ideas are meant to promote weight loss in calories and insulin release, thus supporting the maintenance of insulin sensitivity. The Zone proposes a narrow distribution in the ratio of proteins to carbohydrates, centered at 0.75, which is essential to the balance of the insulin to glucagon ratio, which is highly eicosanoid metabolism and ultimately produces a cascade of biological events. chronic disease risk, enhanced immunity, maximal physical and mental performance, increased longevity and permanent weight loss. ” The Zone Diet is a fad diet in the low-carbohydrate diet that was created by Barry Sears, a biochemist. The diet advocates eating a carbohydrate, with 3 meals and 2 snacks, and including eating proteins, carbohydrates – those with a lower glycemic index are considered more favorable, and fats (monounsaturated fats are considered healthier) in a caloric ratio of 30% -40% -30%. The hand is used as the mnemonic tool; five fingers for five times a day, with no more than five hours between meals. The size and thickness of the carbohydrates and one fist unfavorable carbohydrates. There is a more complex scheme of “Zone blocks” and “mini-blocks” that followers of the diet can use to determine the ratios of consumed macronutrients. Daily exercise is encouraged. The diet falls over the continuum between the USDA-recommended food pyramid which advocates eating grains, vegetables, and fruit and reducing fat, and the high-fat Atkins Diet. Read More…

Yup’ik cuisine

” ‘Yup’ik cuisine’ ‘(Yupiit neqait’ ‘in Yup’ik language, literally “Yup’iks’ foods” or “Yup’iks ‘fishes”) refers to the Eskimo style traditional subsistence food and cuisine of the Yup’ ik people from the western and southwestern Alaska. Also known as ” ‘Cup’ik cuisine’ ” for the Chevak Cup’ik dialect speaking Eskimos of Chevak and ” ‘Cup’ig cuisine’ ” for the Nunivak Cup’ig dialect speaking Eskimos of Nunivak Island. This cuisine is traditionally based on meat, fish, sea and land mammals, and contains high levels of protein. Subsistence foods are considered by many to be nutritionally superior superfoods. Yup’ik diet is different from Alaskan Inupiat, Canadian Inuit, and Greenlandic diets. Fish as food (especially Salmonidae species, such as salmon and whitefish) are primary food for Yup’ik Eskimos. Both food and fish called neqa in Yup’ik. Food preparation techniques are fermentation and cooking, also uncooked raw. Cooking methods are baking, roasting, barbecuing, frying, smoking, boiling, and steaming. Food preservation methods are mostly dry and less often frozen. Dried fish is usually eaten with oil seal. The ulu gold fan-shaped knife used for cutting fish, meat, food, and such. The Yup’ik, like other Eskimo groups, were semi-nomadic hunter-fisher-gatherers who moved seasonally throughout the year within a reasonably well-defined territory to harvest fish, bird, sea and land mammal, berry and other renewable resources. Yup ‘ ik cuisine is based on traditional subsistence food harvests (hunting, fishing and berry gathering) supplemented by seasonal subsistence activities. The Yup’ik region is rich with waterfowl, fish, and sea and land mammals. The most important species of fish (seals, walruses, beluga whales), many species of fish (Pacific salmon, herring, halibut, flounder, trout, burbot, Alaska blackfish), shellfish, crabs, and seaweed. The Pacific salmon and freshwater whitefish, land mammals (moose, caribou), migratory waterfowl, bird eggs, berries, greens, and roots help the people throughout the region. The akutaq (Eskimo ice cream), tepa (stinkheads), mangtak (muktuk) some of the most well-known traditional Yup’ik delicacies. Traditional subsistence foods are mixed with what is commercially available. Today, the other half is purchased from subsistence activities, the other half is purchased from the commercial stores (market-foods, store-bought foods). Read More…

Yo-yo effect

Yo-yo dieting or yo-yo effect, also known as weight cycling, is a term coined by Kelly Brownell at Yale University, in reference to the cyclical loss and gain of weight, resembling the up-down motion of a yo. In this process, the diet is successful in the pursuit of weight loss and is unsuccessful in maintaining the weight loss. The dieter then seeks to lose the regained weight, and the cycle begins again.

The reasons for yo-yo dieting are varied but often include a hypocaloric diet that was initially too extreme. At first the dieter may experience elation at the thought of weight loss and pride in their rejection of food. Over time, however, the limits imposed by such extreme diets cause such depression or fatigue that make the diet impossible to sustain. Ultimately, the dieter reverts to their old eating habits, with the added effects of failing to lose weight by restrictive diet. Such an emotional state leads many people to eat more than they would have before dieting, causing them to rapidly regain weight. The process of regaining weight and especially body fat is further promoted by the high metabolic plasticity of skeletal muscle. The Summermatter Cycle explains how skeletal muscle persistently reduces energy expenditure during dieting. In addition, food restriction increases physical activity which further supports body weight loss initially. When food becomes available again, the thrifty program promotes the refilling of energy stores which preferentially occurs as fat catch-up. Read More…

Whole30

The Whole30 is a 30-day fad diet that emphasizes whole foods and during which participants eliminate sugar, alcohol, grains, vegetables, soy, and dairy from their diets. The Whole30 is similar to the more restrictive than the paleo diet, as adherents may not eat natural sweeteners like honey or maple syrup. Foods allowed during the program include meat, nuts, seeds, seafood, eggs, vegetables, and fruits. During the Whole30, participants are advised to count calories or to weigh themselves. After the program is complete, participants are counseled to strategically reintroduce the foods of the whole30 list, document the health consequences and culinary value of these additions, and determine if the addition is desired. The program’s founders believe that sugar, grains, dairy, alcohol, and vegetables affect weight, energy, and stress levels. Read More…

Whole food

All foods are processed and processed, before being consumed. Whole grains, tubers, vegetables, fruits, vegetables. There is some confusion about the use of the inclusion of certain foods, in particular animal foods. The modern use of the term whole diet is now widely known as “whole foods plant based diet” with animal products. The title of the post-industrialist in the post-industrial age 1946 in The Farmer, a quarterly magazine published and edited by his farmer F. Newman Turner, a writer and pioneering organic farmer. The magazine sponsored the establishment of the Consumer Producer Whole Food Society Ltd, with Newman Turner as president and Derek Randal as vice-president. Whole food was defined as “mature produce of field, orchard, or garden without subtraction, addition, or alteration grown from seed without chemical dressing, in fertile soil manure with animal and vegetable wastes, and composts therefrom, and ground, raw rock and without chemical manures, sprays, or insecticides, “having the intention to connect suppliers and the growing public demand for such food. Such diets are rich in whole grains, dark green and yellow / orange-fleshed vegetables and fruits, vegetables, nuts and seeds. Read More…

Western pattern diet

The Western pattern diet or Standard American Diet (SAD) is a modern dietary pattern that is characterized by high intakes of red and processed meat, butter, fried foods, high-fat dairy products, eggs, refined grains, potatoes, and high- sugar drinks. The modern American diet was brought about by fundamental lifestyle changes following the Neolithic Revolution, and, later, the Industrial Revolution. By contrast, a healthy diet has higher proportions of fruits, nuts, vegetables, whole grain foods, poultry, and fish. Read More…

Werewolf diet

The diet werewolf, also known as the lunar diet and the diet, is a diet that centers upon users fasting to the lunar phases. This diet has been introduced to the diet plan of the “werewolf diet” as a result. Celebrities that have endorsed the diet Demi Moore and Madonna. The diet is either performed in one of two fashions: the “basic moon plan” or the “extended version”. The first plan is a variation of the grapefruit diet. This is typically performed in a 24 hour period. The extended version requires the dieter to begin with the beginning of the full moon and then follow a series of eating plans tailored to the various moon phases, Read More…

Wellspring camps

Wellspring Camps are a group of children’s health and wellness camps located in California and Florida. The camp focuses on changing behavior and eating patterns in order to create long-term healthy lifestyles for participants. Due to “economic feasibility” Wellspring Camps is not currently operating. However, the camp previously operated in La Jolla, California and Melbourne, Florida.

Wellspring opened their first two summer camps in June 2004 Healthy Living Academies. Camp Wellspring, located in the Adirondack Mountains of New York, accepted women ages 16 – 23. Wellspring Adventure Camp, in the mountains of North Carolina, accepted boys and girls ages 10-17 years old. Ryan Craig, a former member of the Aspen Education Board of Directors was appointed president of Healthy Living Academies. Kirschenbaum, Ph.D., Ph.D., is one of the leading researchers in the field of healthy living. He is a past president of the Division of Exercise and Sport Psychology of the American Psychological Association and has authored over 100 scientific articles and eight books, Read More…

Wellspring Academies

Wellspring Academies is a pair of therapeutic boarding schools for overweight and obese children, teens, and young adults, both operated by Wellspring, a division of Aspen Education Group. It is said to be the first weight loss boarding school in the United States. As of September 2009 Wellspring Academies had two campuses.

The Academy of the Sierras was founded in California by Ryan D. Craig, who also served as the first Executive Director. Aspen invested $ 6.5 million in the start-up. The school’s second location in North Carolina was established in 2007. Wellspring Academies closed in January 2014 to the economic downturn and the inability of families to pay for the treatment program. Read More…

Very-low-calorie diet

Very low calorie diet (VLCD) is a very low calorie diet. It is defined as a diet of per day or less. VLCDs are formulated, nutritionally complete, liquid meals containing 800 kilocalories or less per day. VLCDs also contain the daily requirements for vitamins, minerals, trace elements, fatty acids and protein. Carbohydrate may be entirely absent, or substituted for a portion of the protein; this choice has important metabolic effects. The VLCD is usually a powder that is mixed with water or another low-food-energy liquid. The VLCD is prescribed on a case basis for rapid weight loss (about 1.5 to 2.5 kilograms or 3 to 5 pounds per week) in people with Body Mass Index of 30 and above. The health care provider may recommend a patient with a BMI between 27 and 30 if the medical complications of the patient. It results in 4% more weight loss as compared to control. Read More…

Vegetarianism

Vegetarianism is the practice of abstaining from the consumption of meat, poultry, seafood, and the flesh of any other animal, and may also include abstention from by products of animal slaughter. <ref name = “navs-online.org”> Vegetarianism can be adopted for various reasons. Many people object to eat meat out of respect for life. Such ethical motivations have been codified under various religious beliefs, as well as animal rights advocacy. Other motivations for vegetarianism are health-related, political, environmental, cultural, aesthetic, economic, or personal preference. There are variations of the diet and diet in the diet, including the production of eggs and dairy products, an ovo-vegetarian diet, a lacto-vegetarian diet, and a lacto-vegetarian diet. A vegan diet excludes all animal products, including eggs and dairy. Some vegans also avoid other animal products such as beeswax, leather or silk clothing, and goose-fat shoe polish. Such foods, such as cookies, candies, chocolate, yogurt, and marshmallows, often contain an unfamiliar animal ingredient, may be a special concern for vegetarians due to the likelihood of such additions. Often, prior to purchase or consumption, vegetarians will voteize products for animal-derived ingredients. Vegetarians’ feelings vary with regard to these ingredients. For example, while some vegetarians may be unaware of animal-derived rennet’s role in the production of cheese, and may therefore unknowingly consume the product, other vegetarians may not take issue with its consumption. Semi-vegetarian diets consist largely of vegetarian foods but may include fish or poultry, or sometimes other meats, on an infrequent basis. Those with diets containing fish or poultry may define meat only and may identify with vegetarianism. A pescetarian diet has been described as “fish but no other meat”. The common use of such diets and vegetarianism has led to such vegetarian groups as the Vegetarian Society to state diets containing these ingredients are not vegetarian, because fish and birds are also animals. Read More…

Total Diet Study

The Total Diet Study is the US FDA’s ongoing annual assessment of US consumers’ average dietary intake of 800 contaminants and nutrients since 1961.

The Total Diet Study is the US FDA’s ongoing annual assessment of US consumers’ average dietary intake of about 800 contaminants and nutrients. This Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition at College Park, Maryland has been buying, preparing, and analyzing about “280 kinds of foods and beverages from representative areas of the country, four times a year”. To make estimates as feasible, North-West, West, South, and Northeast are two options. The purchases or market shoes are identical as much as possible. It is bought in supermarkets, grocery stores, and fast food restaurants in three cities per region, which changes every year. The FDA Kansas City District Laboratory in Lenexa, Kansas is the central lab for the country and prepares and analyzes each of the two types of food. Foods are prepared “as consumers typically would”, which includes washing, peeling, cooking. Radionuclide analyzes are only done by two market players at FDA’s Annual Engineering and Analytical Center in Winchester, Massachusetts. With the analysis, FDA estimates the average consumption by the entire US population, and split up by age and gender (frm age 14 years onward) each year. The food list is made every 10 years to account for food trends, changing patterns of what people eat. Likewise data on how much better food can eat. Read More…

TOPS Club

TOPS Club, Inc. is a non-profit charitable corporation based in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, United States, with members in the United States and Canada. Its twofold objective is to sponsor research and support groups in human body weight control. Most members refer to the organization simply as “TOPS”, an acronym for “Take Off Pounds Sensibly.”

TOPS originally formed in 1948 as a response to the need to assist the organization of the system. Over the years as more weight management problems have been identified, TOPS expanded their scope to include all people with weight problems. KOPS (Keeps Off Pounds Sensibly) members-in-the-know-how-they-like TOPS does not endorse any particular weight-loss plan (see dieting) and welcomes people in the membership even if they are involved in any weight-loss plan. Club meetings emphasize nutrition, exercise, motivation, and wellness education focused on supplementing a member’s effort to manage his or her weight. Real Life: A Hands-On Pounds Off Guide coauthor be leaders in these fields is provided free to all chapters. TOPS publishes educational materials for its members and bimonthly membership magazine, TOPS News. Read More…

Tongue Patch Diet

Tongue Patch Diet (also known as the Weight Reduction Patch, Chugay Patch and Miracle Patch) is a diet that involves a certain amount of eating and eating. After being launched in 2009 by Nikolas Chugay, the diet was criticized by health experts and media outlets.

Tongue Patch Diet was developed by Chugay, a plastic surgeon in Beverly Hills, in 2009. Chugay got the idea of ​​the diet from a friend who was doing a similar procedure in Mexico. Chugay introduced the tongue patch as an alternative to invasive weight loss methods such as gastric bypass or Lapband surgery. In 2011, a similar procedure was introduced in Venezuela. However, the procedure is more popular in Venezuela as compared to the USA. As of 2014, Chugay is the only one in the US that offers this treatment and has been approved by FDA. Read More…

Therapeutic Lifestyle Changes

Therapeutic Lifestyle Changes, also known as the TLC Diet, is a dietary pattern recommended by the National Cholesterol Education Program, part of the National Institutes of Health, to control hypercholesterolemia. This pattern focuses on saturated fats and cholesterol, dietary options to enhance LDL cholesterol lowering, weight control, and physical activity.

High cholesterol is one of the major controllable risk factors for coronary heart disease, heart attack and stroke. The National Institutes of Health created the National Cholesterol Education Program in 1985 to reduce high blood cholesterol levels. They created the TLC diet to be used alone or in conjunction with medication management to elevated cholesterol control. The treatment was established in the Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III) for high cholesterol in adults which was released in 2002. Updated guidelines for cholesterol management were established in 2013 by the American Heart Association (AHA) and the American College of Cardiology (ACC) . Read More…

Taoist diet

While there are many historical and modern schools of Taoism, it is safe to say that they are very important to their physical, mental and spiritual health. in the food is concerned.

Some early Taoist diets called for bigu (), based on the belief that immortality could be achieved in this way. The ancient Taoist texts of the Taiping Jing suggest that those who would have attained the state of the world would not need to be absorbed by the cosmic qi. Read More…

Swank diet

The Swank Diet is a diet that is low in saturated fat, which was proposed in 1949 by Roy Laver Swank, MD, PhD (1909-2008), an academic neurologist at the University of Oregon, for the treatment of multiple sclerosis. The claims made for the diet are unsubstantiated by Dr. Swanks’ publications, eg, Archives of Neurology & Psychiatry. Read More…

Sustainable diet

Sustainable diets are defined as “those diets with low environmental impacts” and “sustainable diets are protective and respectful of biodiversity and ecosystems, culturally acceptable, accessible, economically fair and affordable, are nutritionally adequate, safe, and healthy, and optimize natural and human resources. ” Et al. This includes the study of eating patterns and the impact of food and nutrition on the health of people and the environment. This growing body of research is recognized by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and the World Health Organization (WHO). A growing population and an increase in income are shifting global demands to be known as the global diet. It requires a high protein diet, oils, salts and processed foods. Additional research and methods that will help address issues such as agricultural production methods, food waste, environmental problems like the declination of biodiversity and global warming, are necessary for promoting sustainable diets, Read More…

Specific carbohydrate diet

Specific carbohydrate diet (SCD) is a restrictive diet first described by Sidney V. Haas (1870-1964) in 1924 to treat celiac disease, and further refined in his 1951 medical textbook The Management of Celiac Disease. It was later re-popularized in 1987 by Elaine Gottschall, the mother of one of Haas’s patients. The SCD is a gluten-free diet since no grains are permitted, and the SCD was a popular treatment for celiac disease. The diet can prevent further damage in people with Crohns disease. Read More…

Sonoma diet

The Sonoma Diet is a dietary system that was developed by Connie Guttersen, and is a derivation of the Mediterranean diet. The diet plan is one of the best known foods in the world. According to the creator of the diet these foods were chosen for their nutritional value and intense flavors. The power foods are whole grains, almonds, bell peppers, tomatoes, broccoli, grapes, spinach, blueberries, strawberries and olive oil.

Dr. Connie Guttersen, RD, Ph.D. is a registered dietitian and nutrition instructor at the Culinary Institute of America. She developed the Standards of Care for the Obesity Treatment Center in Bellevue, Washington and she served as an instructor on nutrition and food science at Texas Christian University. Read More…

Soft diet

A mechanical soft diet or edentulous diet is a diet that involves foods that are soft, with the goal of reducing or eliminating the need for food. It is recommended for people who have difficulty chewing food, including people with certain types of dysphagia (difficulty swallowing), the loss of many or all teeth, the surgery involving the jaw, the mouth or gastrointestinal tract, and the bread of newly adjusted dental braces. They are mashed, puréed, chopped very small, combined with gravy or gravy, or softened in liquid. In some situations, there are additional restrictions. For example, patients who need to avoid acid reflux, such as those recovering from esophageal surgery for achalasia, are also instructed to stay away from foods that can aggravate reflux, which include ketchup and other tomato products, citrus fruit, chocolate, mint, spicy foods, alcohol, and caffeine. Foods such as tomatoes and blackberries can be restricted because they contain small seeds. Read More…

Semi-vegetarianism

A semi-vegetarian or flexitarian diet is one that is plant-based with the occasional inclusion of meat. In 2003, the American Dialect Society voted in favor of the most useful word.

Vegetarianism is the practice of abstaining from consuming meat. Along with the term flexitarian, which was listed in the mainstream ” Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary in 2012, other neologisms for semi-vegetarianism are reducetarianism and lessetarianism ”. Common reasons for adopting a semi-vegetarian may be related to animal welfare (including health), or the environment, or the environment (see environmental vegetarianism), which are also arguments in favor of adopting a fully vegetarian diet. While semi-vegetarians may view the meat or animal products as occasional indulgences, staunch vegetarians may resent the term or view it as cheating or as a moral lapse. In contrast, Many proponents of veganism embrace semi-vegetarianism as a way to get a broader section of the general public to act on arguments for veganism, with the result that more animal suffering and environmental degradation will be avoided if the public views -or-nothing. Read More…

Saturated fat and cardiovascular disease

Most medical, scientific, heart-health, governmental, and public authorities agree that a significant risk factor for cardiovascular disease, including the World Health Organization, the Food and Nutrition Board of the National Academy of Medicine, the American Dietetic Association, the Dietitians of Canada, the British Dietetic Association, the American Heart Association, the British Heart Foundation, the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, the World Heart Federation, the British National Health Service, the United States Food and Drug Administration, and the European Food Safety Authority. All of these organizations recommend restricting consumption of saturated fats to reduce that risk. HOWEVER, Read More…

Sattvic diet

Sattvic diet is a diet based on foods in Ayurveda and Yoga literature that contain quality (guna). In this system of dietary classification, foods that decrease the energy of the body are considered. Sattvic diet is meant to include food and clothing that is “pure, essential, natural, vital, energy-containing, clean, conscious, true, honest, wise”. Sattvic diet is a regimen that places emphasis on seasonal foods, fruits, dairy products, nuts, seeds, oils, ripe vegetables, vegetables, whole grains, and non-meat based proteins. Some Sattvic diet suggestions, such as its relative emphasis on dairy products, is controversial. Sattvic diet is sometimes referred to as a yogic diet in modern literature. In ancient and medieval era Yoga literature, Read More…

Salt and cardiovascular disease

Salt consumption has been intensely studied for its role in human physiology and impact on human health. In particular, excessive dietary salt intake is associated with an increased incidence of cardiovascular disease and other adverse effects. Common edible salt is composed of sodium chloride.

The human body has the same effect as the renin-angiotensin system. In humans, salt has important biological functions. In particular, it is highly involved with the maintenance of fluid volume, including osmotic balance in the blood, extracellular and intracellular fluids, and resting membrane potential. The best known effect of sodium on blood pressure can be explained by comparing blood with salinity. Artery walls are analogous to a selectively permeable membrane, and they allow solutes, including sodium and chloride, to pass through (or not), depending on osmosis. Circulating water and solutes in the body and blood pressure, as well as other functions of regulation of body temperature. When salt is ingested, it is dissolved in the blood as two separate ions – Na + and Cl -. The water potential in blood will decrease to increase solutes, and blood osmotic pressure will increase. While the kidneys react to excess sodium and chloride in the body, water retention causes blood pressure to increase. Read More…

Rice diet

The Rice Diet started as a radical treatment for malignant hypertension before the advent of antihypertensive drugs; the original diet included strict dietary restriction and hospitalization for monitoring. Some contemporary versions have been greatly relaxed, and have been described as fad diets.

The Rice Diet Program was founded in 1939 by Dr. Walter Kempner, a refugee from the Nazis, who was at that time associated with Duke University. Kempner had many patients with malignant hypertension and kidney failure, and there were no good treatments for those patients. He believed that the kidney had two functions, one excretory and the other metabolic, and “he theorized that the protein and electrolyte load on the kidney was reduced to a minimum, the kidney might be better performing its more essential metabolic role. His reasoning is obscure, but he began to treat patients with malignant hypertension, and they were rapidly improved. Kempner’s implementation was very strict, But also careful – patients were hospitalized for several weeks at the beginning of treatment. The initial treatment was made with a diet of “white rice, sugar, fruit, fruit juices, vitamins and iron, and provided about 2000 calories, 20 grams of protein, and 700-1000 ml of liquid as Sodium content was extremely low, about 250 milligrams per day, and the content of 100 milligrams per day. ” If results were good, after several small months of lean meat and vegetables were added to the diet. Kempner obtained remarkable results, and was invited to attend a meeting of the New York Academy of Medicine in 1946. Read More…

Rhubarb diet

The rhubarb diet is a fad diet, originating in the Huangdi Neijing, which is gaining popularity in Western Europe. It is a substitute for boiled rhubarb and milk products (normally milk) for two meals daily. The laxative effect of rhubarb may aid weight loss. Advocates claim that rhubarb increases the effect of milk products, causing the body to store less fat. People who have tried the diet claim they have lost, on average, per month. Read More…

Reducetarian Foundation

The Reducetarian Foundation is a nonprofit organization that promotes a “reducetarian” diet, where participants reduce the amount of meat and dairy products they consume in order to improve their health, protect the environment, and spare farmed animals from cruelty. Brian Kateman is the cofounder and president of the organization and one of the main proponents of the diet. He is skeptical of only using “all or nothing” messages like veganism and vegetarianism, believing that they will be more productive. Read More…

Raw foodism

Raw foodism, also known as a raw food diet, is the dietary practice of eating only (or mostly) food that is uncooked and unprocessed. Depending on the philosophy, or type of lifestyle and desired products, raw food diets may include a selection of fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds, eggs, fish, meat, and dairy products. It may also include various types of sprouted seeds, cheese, and fermented foods such as yogurts, kefir, kombucha, or sauerkraut, but these foods have been pasteurized, homogenized, or produced with the use of synthetic pesticides. , chemical fertilizers, industrial solvents, or chemical food additives. Read More…

Raw animal food diets

Foods included in raw animal food diets include any food that can be eaten raw, so raw, unprocessed meats / organ-meats / raw eggs, raw milk, and aged, fermenting meat / fish / shellfish / dough (such as kefir), to extent, nuts / sprouts / seedlings / fruits, but not raw grains, raw beans, raw soy etc., because of digestibility and toxicity issues to reject neolithic or domesticated foods. Raw foods on such diets have been heated at temperatures above. “Raw Animal Foodists” believe that these foods are safe to eat. Smoked meats are frowned upon by many Raw-Omnivores. Some make a distinction between hot-smoked and cold-smoked. Those who eat a raw omnivorous diet usually choose to obtain their sources, to avoid harmful bacteria. A study by Cornell University has determined that grass-fed animals have far fewer E. coli (about 1 / 300th) than their grain fed counterparts. Also in the same study, the amount of ” E. coli ” they do not have much to do, but gastric acid. Grass-fed meat also has more nutrients, such as vitamins, minerals, and omega-3 fatty acids, than grain-finished meat. Read More…

Ralstonism

Ralstonism was a social movement in 19th century US. It claimed about 800,000 followers. Ralstonism was the brainchild of Webster Edgerly (1852-1926). In Edgerly’s words, “Ralstonism is the grandest movement that man is capable of establishing”. Ralstonism began as the Ralston Health Club, which published Edgerly’s writings. It was a hierarchical organization where they were ranked as having degrees, which ranked from 0 to 100. Although Edgerly claimed in the 1900 edition of the Book of General Membership of the Ralston Health Club that the letters for the word RALSTON came from Regime, Activity, Light, Strength, Temperation, Oxygen and Nature, Previous editions of the same book are credited to Everett Ralston, a pseudonym of Edgerly, with the implication that this is the name of the person. Edgerly saw his followers as founding members of a new race, based on Caucasians, and free from “impurities”. He advocated the castration of all “anti-racial” (non-Caucasian) males at birth. Read More…

Prozis

Prozis is an internet-based Portuguese company that is part of the OSIT group and is active in sports nutrition retail sector. The company is based in Esposende and is one of the largest sports nutrition stores in Europe, with over 800,000 registered and active customers across more than 100 markets. In 2015, it employed over 230 people and had a revenue of more than 45 million euros. Prozis was founded in 2006 by Miguel Milhão. Besides selling supplements online, it was also produced in Póvoa de Lanhoso, in which an amount of 5 million euros was invested. Read More…

Protein-sparing modified fast

A protein-sparing modified fast (PSMF) is a very low calorie diet with some protein, fluids, and vitamin and mineral supplementation. The diet is to last about eight months. While people often lose weight they often regain it afterwards. PSMFs were first designed in the 1970s. Health concerns include dehydration being a health concern, hence fluids, vitamin and mineral (potassium, magnesium, sodium, and calcium) supplementation is mandatory and doctor’s supervision is recommended. Since PSMF is minimal to no fat, gallbladder stones can be exacerbated from rapid weight loss, and it is recommended to at least obtain a minimum amount of fat daily for this reason. PSMF diets consist of foods that are naturally rich in good-quality protein (chicken breast, lean beef, tuna, egg white, ham, Read More…

Pritikin diet

The Pritikin diet is a low-fat, high-fiber diet which forms part of the “Pritikin Program for Diet and Exercise”, a lifestyle regimen originally created by Nathan Pritikin. The 1979 book describing the diet became a bestseller.

The diet is based on low-fat, high-fiber food, and reduced meat, alcohol and processed food. When it was started the diet was considered radical, but its precepts are largely controlled by mainstream nutritional advice. The Pritikin Diet has been categorized as a fad diet with a possible boring food choice, flatulence, and the risk of feeling too hungry. Read More…

Preoperative fasting

Preoperative fasting is the practice of a patient. This is intended to prevent pulmonary aspiration of the stomach contents during general anesthesia.

The main reason for preoperative fasting is to prevent pulmonary aspiration of the stomach while under the effects of general anesthesia. Aspiration of as little as 30-40 mL can be a significant cause of suffering and death during an operation and therefore fasting. Several factors can be predisposed to aspiration of stomach contents including inadequate anesthesia, pregnancy, obesity, difficult airways, emergency surgery (since fasting time is reduced), full stomach and altered gastrointestinal mobility. Increased fasting times leads to Read More…

Portfolio diet

David J. Jenkins in 2003 to lower blood cholesterol. This diet emphasizes the use of cholesterol lowering to enhance this effect. Viscous fiber, soy protein, plant sterols, and nuts are the essential components of portfolio diet. This diet is low in fat saturated, high in fiber. Researches have found it comparable blood cholesterol effect to statin treatment. Background Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. Several risk factors, such as high blood pressure, high blood cholesterol, overweight or obese, smoking, have been identified to promote cardiovascular diseases. American Heart Association (AHA) and American College of Cardiology (ACC) have suggested life-style management to control risk factors in order to reduce cardiovascular risk. One of the strategies is reducing dietary saturated fat intake to low blood pressure lipoprotein (LDL) which is considered to be “bad” blood cholesterol. If dietary and life style management is ineffective, such a procedure will be used to reduce blood cholesterol levels. Soy protein, nuts, viscous fiber, and plant sterols have been found to have lower cholesterol effect. Read More…

Polymeal

The Polymeal is a diet-based approach to fighting heart disease, proposed in December 2004 by Oscar Franco, a Colombian public health scientist at the University Medical Center in Rotterdam, Netherlands. Franco and his colleagues suggest the “Polymeal” as a natural alternative to the “Polypill”, a multi-drug-based strategy for reducing heart disease. The researchers used the same technique in the polypill paper: a statistical “meta-analysis” which combined the results of many previous studies. The paper, appearing in the BMJ’s traditionally light-hearted Christmas issue, can be viewed as somewhat satirical, as noted in the journal. The study claims that the adherence to the polymeal diet would be delayed by eight years among women. Because cardiovascular disease is the # 1 cause of mortality in first-world nations, this delay of heart failure would increase the average life span of men by six years and women by 5.5 years. Since the Polymeal is based on the principles of combating inflammation, Read More…

Plant-based diet

A plant-based diet is based on plants, including vegetables, whole grains, nuts, seeds, vegetables and fruits, but with few or no animal products. The use of the phrase has changed over time, and the use of the phrase “plant-based diet” being used to refer to vegan diets, meat, and to diets with varying amounts of animal-based foods, such as semi-vegetarian diets As of 1999, it was estimated that four billion people live primarily on a plant-based diet because of limits caused by shortages of cropland, freshwater, and energy resources. Read More…

Pescetarianism

Pescetarianism (also spelled pescatarianism) is the practice of following a diet that includes fish or other seafood, but not the flesh of other animals. Those on pescetarian or pollotarian diets may define meat only as mammalian flesh and may identify with vegetarianism. Most pescetarians maintain a lacto-ovo vegetarian diet with the addition of fish and shellfish, described as “fish but no other meat”. The common use of such diets and vegetarianism has led to such groups as the Vegetarian Society that diets containing these ingredients are not vegetarian. Read More…

Paleolithic diet

The terms Paleolithic diet, paleo diet, caveman diet, and stone-age diet describe modern fad diets requiring the sole or predominant consumption of foods to be consumed by humans during the Paleolithic era. The digestive abilities of anatomically modern humans, however, are different from those of Paleolithic humans, which undermines the diet’s core premise. During the 2.6-million-year-long Paleolithic era, the highly variable climate and global spread of human populations were, by necessity, nutritionally adaptable. Supporters of the diet mistakenly presupposes that human digestion has been essentially unchanged over time. While there is much variability in the way of the diet is explained, the diet usually includes vegetables, fruits, nuts, roots, and meat products, such as grains, sugar, vegetables, processed oils, salt, alcohol or coffee. The diet is based on not just processed foods, but rather the foods that humans began to eat after the Neolithic Revolution when humans transitioned from hunter-gatherer lifestyles to settled agriculture. The ideas behind the diet can be traced to Walter Voegtlin, and were popularized in the best-selling books of Loren Cordain. Like other fad diets, the Paleo diet is promoted as a way of improving health. There is some evidence that this diet can be compared to those of the body and to the weight of the body. There is no good evidence, however, that the diet helps with weight loss, other than through the normal mechanisms of calorie restriction. Following the Paleo diet can lead to inadequate calcium intake, and side effects can include weakness, diarrhea, and headaches. Read More…

Overeaters Anonymous

OA defines compulsions as “any impulse or feeling of being irresistibly driven towards the performance of some irrational action.” OA further defines compulsive overeating as a progressive, addictive illness. OA compulsive overeating as a chronic condition and part of an attempt to alleviate psychological stress. Like other twelve-step programs, OA is a three-dimensional, three-dimensional illness, symbolically understanding human structure as having three dimensions: physical, mental and spiritual. Compulsive eating manifests itself in each dimension. A book describing itself based on OA methods states that the mental dimension is a compulsive eater is not “eating down” feelings, but rather expressing an “inner hunger.” To help potential members, OA provides a questionnaire, asking questions such as, “Do you give too much time and thought to food?” Answering “yes” to three or more of these questions is considered to be a good indication of the problem. Read More…

Orthopathy

Orthopathy (from the Greek ὀρθός orthos “right” and πάθος pathos “suffering”) or Natural Hygiene (NH) is a set of alternative medical beliefs and practices originating from the Nature Cure movement. Proponents claim that fasting, dieting, and other lifestyle measures are necessary to prevent and treat disease. Orthopathy is most prevalent and alternative medical treatment, with the exception of surgery in certain situations, such as for a broken bone and a deadly secondary cause. Orthopathy has its roots in naturopathy and first emerged in the early nineteenth century. Read More…

Organic food

Organic food is produced by methods that comply with the standards of organic farming. Standards vary worldwide, but organic farming in general features practices that strive to cycle resources, ecological balance and preserving biodiversity. Organizations regulating organic products may restrict the use of certain pesticides and fertilizers in farming. In general, organic foods are usually not processed using irradiation, or industrial solvents or synthetic food additives. Currently, the European Union, the United States, Canada, Mexico, Japan, and many other countries require producers to obtain certification in their markets. In the context of these regulations, organic food is produced in such a way that national governments and international organizations. Although the product of the kitchen may be organic, the food industry has been approved by the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) or the European Commission (EC). There is no sufficient evidence in medical literature to support claims that organic food is safer or healthier conventionally grown food. While there may be some differences in the nutrient and antinutrient contents of organically- and conventionally-produced food, the variable nature of food production and handling makes it difficult to generalize results. Claims that organic food tastes better not supported by evidence. with the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) or European Commission (EC). There is no sufficient evidence in medical literature to support claims that organic food is safer or healthier conventionally grown food. While there may be some differences in the nutrient and antinutrient contents of organically- and conventionally-produced food, the variable nature of food production and handling makes it difficult to generalize results. Claims that organic food tastes better not supported by evidence. with the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) or European Commission (EC). There is no sufficient evidence in medical literature to support claims that organic food is safer or healthier conventionally grown food. While there may be some differences in the nutrient and antinutrient contents of organically- and conventionally-produced food, the variable nature of food production and handling makes it difficult to generalize results. Claims that organic food tastes better not supported by evidence. There is no sufficient evidence in medical literature to support claims that organic food is safer or healthier conventionally grown food. While there may be some differences in the nutrient and antinutrient contents of organically- and conventionally-produced food, the variable nature of food production and handling makes it difficult to generalize results. Claims that organic food tastes better not supported by evidence. There is no sufficient evidence in medical literature to support claims that organic food is safer or healthier conventionally grown food. While there may be some differences in the nutrient and antinutrient contents of organically- and conventionally-produced food, the variable nature of food production and handling makes it difficult to generalize results. Claims that organic food tastes better not supported by evidence. Read More…

Okinawa diet

The Okinawa diet describes the eating habits of the indigenous people of the Ryukyu Islands, which are believed to be their exceptional longevity. It is also the name of a weight-loss diet based on this.

People from the Ryukyu Islands (of which Okinawa is the largest) have a life expectancy among the highest in the world, the male life expectancy rank among Japanese prefectures has plummeted in recent years. The traditional diet of the islanders contains 30% green and yellow vegetables. Although the traditional Japanese diet usually includes large quantities of rice, the traditional Okinawa diet consists of smaller quantities of rice; instead the staple is the purple-fleshed Okinawan sweet potato. The Okinawan diet has only 30% of the sugar and 15% of the grains of the Japanese dietary intake. Read More…

Nutritional biodiversity

Nutritional biodiversity is a diet that focuses on the diversity of an organism’s nutritional consumption or intake. Some believe this diversity is directly related to the overall health and vitality of the organism – human or animal. Although traditional diets emphasize a sufficient intake of fruits and vegetables, they do not emphasize the range of this intake. Nutritional biodiversity encourages the consumption of about 10 – 15 different green vegetables over a period of a fortnight, rather than the same green vegetable. This extends to all types of fruits and vegetables. Different fruits and vegetables provide different vitamins and minerals, and it is this diversity that is essential to ensure that all nutritional needs are met. It does not require one to consume all types, but to be more or less sufficient for most vitamins and minerals to be consumed. In the book Back from the Brink, an example of the various bloodlines of race horses in the UK and USA. What the author found is that when these animals were removed from the world, these bloodlines appeared to under-perform when compared to those that had been allowed to graze. from fields in which other plants and weeds have been allowed to grow freely. Read More…

Nutrient timing

Nutrient timing is a sports dieting concept that incorporates time as the missing dimension in superior muscular development. This concept represents a change in the previous school of thought, which is focused on the relationship between synchronicity and eating. Proper nutrient timing takes into account two dimensions that directly correlate to performance: Read More…

No-carbohydrate diet

A no-carbohydrate diet (no-carb diet, zero carb diet) excludes dietary consumption of all carbohydrates (including dietary fiber) and suggests fat as the source of energy with sufficient protein. A no-carbohydrate diet may be ketogenic, which causes the body to go into a state of ketosis, converting dietary fat and body fat. the brain. Some bodily organs and parts of the brain still require glucose, which is tightly regulated by gluconeogenesis or by the conversion of glycerol from the breakdown of triglycerides. A no-carbohydrate diet may be used, but it is not prescriptive of the diet, which, by definition, Read More…

NIA rhesus macaque calorie restriction study

The NIA rhesus macaque calorie restriction study was a study started in 1987 by the National Institute of Aging. It showed that calorie restriction did not extend to life or death in myriad monkeys. It did improve certain measures of health, however. These results were published in the Wisconsin rhesus macaque calorie restriction study, which also began in 1987 and showed increases in the following macaques rhesus following calorie restriction. Read More…

Negative-calorie food

A negative-calorie food is food that requires more food energy. Its thermic effect or specific dynamic action-the caloric “cost” of digesting the food-would be greater than its food energy content. Despite its recurring popularity in dieting guides, there is no scientific evidence supporting the idea that any food is calorically negative. While some chilled beverages are calorically negative, the effect is minimal and large amounts of water can be dangerous. Read More…

Mushbooh

Mushbooh is a food designation in Islam. Literally meaning “doubtful” or “suspicious,” foods are labeled when they are unclear whether they are Halal (consumption is permitted) or Haraam (haram) (consumption is prohibited). Read More…

Muesli belt malnutrition

Muesli belt malnutrition is a term coined by Professor Vincent Marks, author of the Panic Nation book, to describe the hypothesis that parents are feeding their children as “an extremely healthy” diet could be deprived of their children of essential fats. A study carried out at Bristol University examining the diets of British toddlers found that such fears were overstated. The study found that while in the lowest fat group has lower intakes of zinc and vitamin A, children in the highest fat group ingested less iron and vitamin C. Overall, the children were significantly deprived of any essential nutrients, regardless of their diets. Read More…

Morning banana diet

The Morning Banana Diet is a fad diet that was popular in Japan in 2008 and had some practice in the West. The diet plan allows you to eat a meal or a meal. Lunch and dinner food choices are unrestricted. Users may have one or more bananas, but no other desserts are permitted. Nothing is eaten after 8 pm, and the dieter must go to bed by midnight. The diet was created by Osaka pharmacist Sumiko Watanabe, who lost 37 pounds (16.8 kg) in weight. He popularized the diet when he wrote it on Mixi, one of Japan’s largest social networking services. Over 730,000 Morning Banana Diet Books were sold in 2008. Possible problems with the diet include the misuse of the unregulated lunch and dinner. Read More…

Montignac diet

Carbohydrate-rich foods are classified according to their glycemic index (GI), a ranking system for carbohydrates based on their blood glucose levels after meals. High-GI carbohydrates are considered “bad” (with the exception of those foods that cause high GIs, even though they have high levels of carbohydrate and low glycemic load or low GL levels). ). The glycemic index was devised by Jenkins et al. at the University of Toronto the way to a healthy diet for diabetes and diabetes mellitus. Montignac was the first to recommend using the glycemic index as a slimming diet rather than a way of managing blood sugar levels, and recommendations to avoid sharp increases in blood glucose levels (as opposed to gradual increases) to a strategy for anyone to lose weight rather than a strategy for diabetes to stabilize blood sugar levels. Montignac’s diet was followed by the South Beach Diet which also used the GI principle, and Michael Mosley’s Intermittent Fasting 5: 2 diet incorporates a recommendation to select foods with a low glycemic index or glycemic load. “Bad carbohydrates”, such as those in sweets, potatoes, rice and white bread, can be taken together with fats, especially during Phase 1 of the Method. According to Montignac ‘s theory, these combinations will lead to the fats in the food being stored as body fat. (Some kinds of pasta, such as “al dente” durum wheat spaghetti, some varieties of rice, such as long-grain Basmati, whole grain and high-fiber foods, have a lower GI.) Read More…

Monotrophic diet

A monotrophic diet or diet is one type of diet or one type of food (such as fruit).

Nutrionists caution that a monotrophic diet may lead to malnourishment, muscle loss, deficiency or dangerous excess of certain nutrients, and difficulty in losing future weight. Read More…

MIND diet

The Mediterranean-DASH Intervention for Neurodegenerative Diet Delay, or more commonly, the MIND diet, combines the portions of the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet and the Mediterranean diet. Both the diet and the diet have been shown to improve cognition; however, neither has been developed to slow neurodegeneration (eg Alzheimer’s disease). Therefore, a team at Rush University Medical Center, headed by Martha Clare Morris (a nutritional epidemiologist), worked to create the MIND diet. Like the DASH and Mediterranean diet, the MIND diet emphasizes the intake of fresh fruit, vegetables, and vegetables. The MIND diet also includes recommendations for specific foods, like leafy greens and berries, which have been scientifically shown to slow cognitive decline. Recent research has shown that the MIND diet is more effective at reducing cognitive decline than either the Mediterranean or DASH diets alone. Additional testing has shown that the level of adherence to the MIND diet also impacts the diet’s neuro-protective effects. Read More…

Metabolic typing

Proponents of Metabolic typing believe that each has a unique metabolism, and that the proportion of macromolecules (proteins, carbohydrates and fats) which are optimal for one person may not be for a second, and could be detrimental to them. Metabolic typing uses common symptoms of the skin, eyes, and other parts of the body to assess different aspects of a person’s metabolism and categorize them into broad metabolic types. In addition, some proponents of metabolic typing are used to determine a person’s metabolic type. A number of somewhat different metabolic typing diets are currently marketed, though the validity and effectiveness of metabolic typing have yet to be established. Read More…

Mediterranean Diet Foundation

The Mediterranean Diet Foundation (Fundación Dieta Mediterránea, FDM) is a non-profit organization based in Barcelona that aims to promote the study, investigation and dissemination of the benefits of the Mediterranean diet.

Its mission is to promote investigation of the health, historical, cultural and gastronomical aspects of the Mediterranean diet. Another of the Foundation’s objectives is the dissemination of scientific findings on the diet and the promotion of its healthful use among different population groups. Read More…

Mediterranean diet

The Mediterranean diet is a diet inspired by the clothes of Greece, Southern Italy, and Spain in the 1940s and 1950s. The main aspects of this diet include the consumption of olive oil, vegetables, unrefined cereals, fruits, and vegetables, moderate to high consumption of fish, moderate consumption, and low consumption. consumption of non-fish meat products. There is some evidence that the Mediterranean diet lowers the risk of heart disease and early death. Olive oil may be the main health-promoting component of the diet. It is preliminary evidence that it is possible to reduce the risk of cancer, cardiovascular disease, neurodegeneration, and several chronic diseases. In 2013, UNESCO added the Mediterranean diet to the Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity of Italy (promoter), Spain, Portugal, Morocco, Greece, Cyprus, and Croatia. It was chosen because “The Mediterranean diet involves a set of skills, knowledge, rituals, symbols and traditions concerning crops, harvesting, fishing, animal husbandry, conservation, processing, cooking, and particularly the sharing and consumption of food.” Read More…

Med Mark

The Med Mark is a packaging symbol that helps consumers identify Mediterranean diet foods. The Med Mark is a postage-stamp-sized symbol, featuring an image of an amphora, the jug used 3,000 years ago by Mediterranean cultures and their food and drinks. It directs the consumers to a website that provides information on the diet pattern. Read More…

Meal replacement

A meal replacement is a drink, bar, soup, etc. as a substitute for a solid food meal, usually with controlled quantities of calories and nutrients. Some drinks are in the form of a health shake. Medically prescribed meal replacement drinks include the required vitamins and minerals. Bodybuilders use food replacements, not formulated for weight loss, to save food when they eat 5 to 6 meals a day. In the European Union, weight-reduction meal replacement (or “replacement diet for weight control”) must provide, and information and advice on packaging by COMMISSION DIRECTIVE 96/8 / EC of 26 February 1996 on foods intended for use in diets for weight reduction. For example, a meal replacement must provide between 200 and 400 calories of energy, of which not more than 30% from fat, and not more than specified amounts for various vitamins and minerals. Labeling information is prescriptive, and packaging must provide a statement that the product should not be used for medical purposes. This protects users of malnutrition from inadvertent malnutrition. In the United States, the term “meal replacement” is not defined in the Federal Food and Drug Administration regulations, but refers to a calorie-controlled, prepackaged product in the form of a bar or beverage (ready to drink or powder), which replaces a regular meal. Meal-replacement products usually provide 200 to 250 calories per serving, and are often referred to as “good” or “excellent source” levels and often bear nutrient content claims. Meal replacement products can be regulated as conventional or functional foods. In Canada, food replacements are regulated by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency and must meet minimum calorie, protein and vitamin requirements. Read More…

Macronutrient preload

Macronutrient is a dietary technique in which a small amount of macronutrients are eaten at a fixed interval before a meal. Fibers in a feeling of fullness in the stomach. The glucomannan fiber is approved for weight control by the European Food Safety Authority. The preload should also have a low glycemic index and contain few calories.

Low-sulfur diet

A low-sulfur diet is a diet with reduced sulfur content. Sulfur containing compounds may also be referred to as thiols or mercaptans. Important dietary sources of sulfur and sulfur containing compounds may be classified as essential mineral (eg elemental sulfur), essential amino acid (methionine) and semi-essential amino acid (eg cysteine). Sulfur is an essential dietary mineral because amino acids contain it. Sulfur is thus considered fundamentally important to human health, and conditions such as nitrogen imbalance and protein-energy malnutrition may result from deficiency. Methionine can not be synthesized by humans, and cysteine ​​synthesis requires a steady supply of sulfur. The recommended daily allowance (RDA) of methionine (combined with cysteine) for adults is 13-14 mg kg-1 day-1 (13-14 mg per kg body weight per day), But some researchers have argued that this figure is too low, and should more appropriately be 25 mg kg-1 day-1. Despite the importance of sulfur, the restrictions of dietary sulfur are sometimes recommended for certain diseases and for other reasons. Read More…

Low-protein diet

A low-protein diet is a diet in which people reduce their intake of protein. Phenylketonuria and Homocystinuria and reduced protein levels have been used for low-protein diet and have been used in pregnancy. Low protein consumption appears to alter the risk of bone breakage, presumably through changes in calcium homeostasis. Therefore, there is no uniform definition of what constitutes low-protein, because the amount and composition of protein for an individual suffering from phenylketonuria would be substantially reduced by one suffering homocystinuria. The amount used by those with liver disease would still be in balance. Amino acids that are excess to requirement can not be stored, but must be modified by the removal of the amine group. As it occurs in the liver and kidneys, it may be advisable to eat less protein. Due to the sulfur content of the amino acids methionine and cysteine, excess of these amino acids leads to the production of acid through sulphate ions. These sulphate ions can be neutralized by calcium ions from bone, which may lead to calcium loss. This potential is leading to reduction in bone mineral density over time. Individuals suffering from phenylketonuria lack the enzyme to convert phenylalanine to tyrosine so low levels of this amino acid need to be provided in the diet. Homocystinuria is an inherited disorder involving the metabolism of the amino acid methionine leading to the accumulation of homocysteine. B6 in the diet. Low-protein diets are in vogue among some members of the general public because of the impact of protein intake on insulin / insulin-like growth factor 1 (IIS) signaling and the direct sensing of amino acid availability by mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) Two systems are implicated in longevity and cancer proliferation. 80:10:10 80:10:10 diet, other attempts to modulate IIS are through intermittent fasting and the 5: 2 diet. Low-protein diets are in vogue among some members of the general public because of the impact of protein intake on insulin / insulin-like growth factor 1 (IIS) signaling and the direct sensing of amino acid availability by mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) Two systems are implicated in longevity and cancer proliferation. 80:10:10 80:10:10 diet, other attempts to modulate IIS are through intermittent fasting and the 5: 2 diet. Low-protein diets are in vogue among some members of the general public because of the impact of protein intake on insulin / insulin-like growth factor 1 (IIS) signaling and the direct sensing of amino acid availability by mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) Two systems are implicated in longevity and cancer proliferation. 80:10:10 80:10:10 diet, other attempts to modulate IIS are through intermittent fasting and the 5: 2 diet. Read More…

Macrobiotic diet

A macrobiotic diet (or macrobiotics) is a fad diet fixed on the ideas of food drawn from Zen Buddhism. The diet is trying to balance the price of yin and yang Major principles of macrobiotic diets are to reduce animal product, and are consumed in the diet. Macrobiotics writers often claim that a macrobiotic is helpful for people with cancer and other chronic diseases, and that the diet can be harmful. Studies that indicate positive results are of poor methodological quality. Neither the American Cancer Society and Cancer Research UK recommend adopting the diet. Suggestions that a macrobiotic diet improves cardiovascular disease and diabetes are explained by the diet being, in part, Read More…

Low-fiber/low-residue diet

A low-fiber / low-residue diet is a diet where goal is smaller and smaller bowel movements each day. The diet may be used as a colonoscopy or as a short-term therapy for acute stages of gastrointestinal illnesses such as Crohn’s Disease, diverticulitis, bowel obstruction, and ulcerative colitis. In addition, a low-fiber diet is often prescribed and / or after abdominal surgery or cancer treatments. Read More…

Low-fat diet

A low-fat diet is one that restricts fat and often saturated fat and cholesterol as well. Low-fat diets are intended to reduce heart disease and obesity, but have been shown to cause obesity. Reducing fat in the diet can make it easier to cut calories. Fat provides nine calories per gram while carbohydrates and protein each provide calories per gram, so choosing low-fat foods makes it possible to eat a larger volume of food for the same number of calories. The Institute of Medicine recommends limiting fat intake to 35% of total calories to help prevent obesity and to help control saturated fat intake. Read More…

Low-carbon diet

A low-carbon diet refers to making choices (GHGe) resulting from consumer decisions. It is estimated that the US food system is responsible for at least 20 percent of US greenhouse gases. This estimate can be taken into account directly from GHGe. Indirect sources, such as demand for products from other countries, are often not counted. A low-carbon diet minimizes the emissions released from the production, packaging, processing, transport, preparation and waste of food. Major tenets of a low-carbon diet, including eating less food and dairy products, eating less processed foods, and the consumption of foods and vegetables. Read More…

Low-carbohydrate diet

Low-carbohydrate diets or low-carb diets are dietary programs that restrict carbohydrate consumption. Highly digestible carbohydrate foods (eg, sugar, bread, pasta) are limited to high and low fat (eg, meat, poultry, fish, shellfish, eggs, cheese, nuts, and seeds) and other foods low in carbohydrates (eg, most salad vegetables such as spinach, kale, chard and collards), and other vegetables and fruits (especially berries) are often allowed. The amount of carbohydrate varies with different low carbohydrate diets. Low carbohydrate diets typically stipulate getting less than 40% of calorie intake from carbohydrates. Some diets restrict carbohydrate intake to cause ketosis. Read More…

Low sodium diet

A low sodium diet is more than 1,500 to 2,400 mg of sodium per day. The human minimum requirement for sodium is about 500 mg per day, which is typically less than one-sixth of many diets “seasoned to taste”. Meniere’s disease may cause a negative effect on health. Read More…

List of countries by food energy intake

Food consumption refers to the amount of food available for human consumption as estimated by the FAO Food Balance Sheets. However, the actual food consumption may be less than the quantity of food available in the household, as during storage, in preparation and cooking, , thrown or given away. According to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, the average minimum daily energy requirement is about 1800 kcal per person. Read More…

Liquid diet

A liquid diet is a diet that is mainly composed of liquids, or soft foods that are at room temperature (such as ice cream). Physiotherapeutics, electrolyte balance, and the like, are usually recommended for the treatment of gastrointestinal disease, or before or after certain types of medical tests. Surgeries involving the mouth or the digestive tract A liquid liquid diet, sometimes called a liquid surgical liquid because of its perioperative uses, consists of a diet containing only transparent liquid foods that do not contain any solid particulates. This includes vegetable broth, broth (excepting any particulate dregs), clear fruit juices such as filtered juice, clear fruit ices or popsicles, clear gelatin desserts, and certain carbonated drinks such as ginger-ale and seltzer water. It excludes all drinks containing milk, but may accept tea or coffee. Typically, this diet contains about 500 calories per day, which is too little food energy for long-term use. A full liquid strained liquid diet consists of both clear and opaque liquid foods with a smooth consistency. People who follow this diet can also take liquid vitamin supplements. Some individuals who are told to follow a full-liquid diet are more certain components of a mechanical soft diet, such as strained meats, sour cream, cottage cheese, ricotta, yogurt, mashed vegetables or fruits, etc. A liquid diet is not recommended outside of hospital or medical supervision. Negative side effects include fatigue, nausea, dizziness,
Read More…

Lacto vegetarianism

A lacto vegetarian (sometimes referred to as a lactarian; from the Latin root lact-, milk) diet is a diet that includes vegetables as well as dairy products such as milk, cheese, yogurt, butter, ghee, cream, and kefir, but excludes eggs. In India, lacto vegetarian is considered synonymous to vegetarian, while eating eggs is considered a form of non-vegetarian diet. The concept and practice of lacto-vegetarianism among a significant number of people comes from ancient India. In other parts of the world, vegetarianism refers to ovo lacto vegetarianism instead, allowing eggs into the diet. Read More…

Kimkins

Kimkins is an online diet program created by Heidi Diaz under the pseudonym ‘Kimmer’ that became famous in 2007 in the magazine ” Woman’s World ”. The program became embroiled in controversy when it was found that it was morbidly obese and had some false testimonials on its website.

The diet was developed by Diaz on an online message board focusing on low-carbohydrate diets Lowcarbfriends.com in 2006. Diaz left the board in 2006 to start Kimkins with a partner, and in January 2007 Kimkins. The program gained popularity when ” Woman’s World ” published in a feature on the diet and its creator ‘Kim Drake’ in their June 12, 2007 issue. In August 2007, there was considerable negative coverage of the diet appearing on the internet, particularly in the form of blogs and several of the site’s administrators have been fired after publicly questioning the diet. In September 2007 a private investigator was hired to investigate Diaz, exposing her real identity to numerous photos demonstrating she was morbidly obese. Read More…

Ketogenic diet

The ketogenic diet is a high-fat, adequate-protein, low-carbohydrate diet that is used primarily in the treatment of epilepsy in children. The diet forces the body to burn fats rather than carbohydrates. Normally, carbohydrates are contained in food glucose, which is then transported around the body and is particularly important in fueling brain function. However, if there is little carbohydrate in the diet, the liver converts fat into fatty acids and ketone bodies. The ketone bodies pass into the brain and replace glucose as an energy source. An elevated level of ketone bodies in the blood, a state known as ketosis, leads to a reduction in the frequency of epileptic seizures. Almost half of children, and young people, with epilepsy who have had some experience in this area, and the effect persists after discontinuing the diet. There is some evidence that the diet may be more effective, and that the strict regimen, such as modified diet, is similarly effective. The most common adverse effect is constipation, affecting about 30% of patients, which has been reduced to less than one year. The original therapeutic diet for pediatric epilepsy provides just enough protein for body growth and repair, and sufficient calories to maintain the correct weight for age and height. The classic therapeutic ketogenic was developed for the treatment of pediatric epilepsy in the 1920s and was widely used in the next decade, but its popularity with the introduction of effective anticonvulsant medications. This classic ketogenic diet contains a 4: 1 ratio by weight of fat to combined protein and carbohydrate. This is achieved by excluding high-carbohydrate starchy foods such as starchy, bread, pasta, grains and sugar, while increasing the consumption of high-fat nuts, cream, and butter. Most dietary fat is made of molecules called long-chain triglycerides (LCTs). However, medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs) -made of fatty acids with shorter carbon chains than LCTs-are more ketogenic. A variant of the classic diet known as MCT ketogenic diet uses a form of coconut oil, which is rich in MCTs, to provide around half the calories. A larger proportion of carbohydrate and protein can be consumed, allowing a greater variety of food choices. In the mid-1990s, Hollywood producer Jim Abrahams, whose son’s severe epilepsy was successfully controlled by the diet, created the Charlie Foundation to promote it. Publicity included an appearance on NBC’s Dateline program and … First Do No Harm (1997), made-for-television movie starring Meryl Streep. The foundation is a multicenter research study, the results of which-announced in 1996-marked the beginning of renewed scientific interest in the diet. Possible therapeutic uses for the ketogenic diet have been studied for various neurological disorders in addition to epilepsy: Alzheimer’s Read More…

KE diet

KE diet also known as feeding a diet is a diet in which an individual feeds a proprietary mixture through a feeding tube for a specific number of days. The dieter does not eat anything while on the diet. It has also been called “Feeding Tube” diet in the United States. The diet carries many serious risks and is not effective in terms of long-term weight loss. Read More…

Ital

Ital, also spelled I-tal, is widely appreciated by those in the Rastafarian movement. It is compulsory in the Nyabinghi mansion, however, in the Twelve Tribes of Israel or Remi mansions. The word derives from the English word “vital”, with the initial “v” removed. This is done to many words in the Rastafarian vocabulary to signify the unity of the speaker with all of nature. The expression of Rasta to Rasta, and the fact that there are many universal rules of Ital living. The primary goal of adhering to an Italian diet is to increase Livity, or the life energy that Rastafari generally believes lives among all human beings, as conferred from the Almighty. A common tenet of Rastafari beliefs is the sharing of a central Livity among living things, and what is put into one ‘ s body should enhance Livity rather than reduce it. Though there are different interpretations of specific foods, the general principle is that food should be natural, or pure, and from the earth; Rastafari is a food additive that is chemically modified or contains artificial additives (eg, color, flavourings, and preservatives). Some salt, especially salt with the artificial addition of iodine, while pure sea salt or kosher salt is eaten by some. In strict interpretations, foods that have been produced using chemicals such as pesticides and fertilizers are not considered. Early adherents adopted their dietary laws based on their interpretation of several books of the Bible, including the Book of Genesis (“Then God said,” I give you every Seed-bearing plant on the face of the earth and every tree that has fruit with seed in it. They will be yours for food. “(Genesis 1:29)), the books of Leviticus and Deuteronomy. Rastafari’s founder Leonard Howell, affectionately called “Gong” and “Gyangunguru Maragh”, though not of Indian descent, was fascinated with Hindu practices and was instrumental in promoting a plant-based diet in the Rastafarian community of Pinnacle. Along with growing dreadlocks and the sacramental smoking of ganja, observing a vegetarian diet is one of the early practices of Rastafari adopted from Indian indentured servants living in Jamaica. Rastafari’s founder Leonard Howell, affectionately called “Gong” and “Gyangunguru Maragh”, though not of Indian descent, was fascinated with Hindu practices and was instrumental in promoting a plant-based diet in the Rastafarian community of Pinnacle. Along with growing dreadlocks and the sacramental smoking of ganja, observing a vegetarian diet is one of the early practices of Rastafari adopted from Indian indentured servants living in Jamaica. Rastafari’s founder Leonard Howell, affectionately called “Gong” and “Gyangunguru Maragh”, though not of Indian descent, was fascinated with Hindu practices and was instrumental in promoting a plant-based diet in the Rastafarian community of Pinnacle. Read More…

Islamic dietary laws

Islamic jurisprudence specifies which foods are [[halal |]] (“lawful”) and which are [[haraam |]] (“unlawful”). This book is based on the Qur’an, the holy book of Islam, as well as the Hadith and Sunnah, libraries cataloging the Islamic Prophet Muhammad. Extensions of these rulings are issued by the author, with varying degrees of strictness, but they are not necessarily widely held. According to the Quran, the only foods explicitly forbidden to eat meat of the world, blood, the meat of pigs, and any food dedicated to other than God. However, a person would not be guilty of sin in a situation where the lack of any alternative creates an undesired requirement that is otherwise unlawful. (Quran 2: Read More…

Inuit cuisine

Inuit consume a diet of foods that are fished, hunted, and locally. According to Edmund Searles in his article “Food and the Making of Modern Inuit Identities”, they consume this type of diet because of the fact that they are effective in keeping the body warm, making the body making that body healthy “.

There has been a decline in the development of young people who lack the skills to survive off the land. They are no longer skilled in growing up to the Qallunaat (“white people”) food they receive from the south. The high costs of hunting equipment-snowmobiles, rifles, sleds, camping gear, gasoline, and oil-is also causing a decline in families who hunt for their meals. * Seal: Depending on the season, Inuit hunt for different types of seal: harp seal, harbor seal, and bearded seal. Ringed seals are hunted all year, while harp seals are only available during the summer. Because they are breathing their holes with their teeth and claws. Through these, Inuit hunters are able to capture seals. When a hunter arrives at these holes, they set a seal that alerts the hunter when a seal is coming up for a breath of air. When the seal comes up, the hunter notices movement in the indicator and uses its harpoon to capture the seal in the water. Read More…

International No Diet Day

International No Diet Day (INDD) is an annual celebration of body acceptance, including fat acceptance and body shape diversity. This day is also dedicated to promoting a healthy life style with a focus on health and nutrition. The Institute of Medicine: “those who complete their weight loss programs” 10 percent of their body weight to two-thirds of the year. The first International No Diet Day was celebrated in the UK in 1992. International Day Diet, especially in the United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, India, Israel, Denmark, Sweden and Brazil. Since 1998 both the International Size Acceptance Association (ISAA) and the National Organization for Women (NOW) have sponsored. ISAA’s day is the International Size Acceptance Day which is celebrated on April 24th. NOW Organizes Your Love Campaign, with its own annual Love Your Body Day in the fall, which criticizes what it defines as “fake Images” of the fashion, beauty and diet industries that require images of women with various body sizes and shapes used instead. International No Diet Day is observed on May 6, and its symbol is a light blue ribbon. with its own annual Love Your Body Day in the fall, which reviews what it defines as “fake Images” of the fashion, beauty and diet industries that are used instead. International No Diet Day is observed on May 6, and its symbol is a light blue ribbon. with its own annual Love Your Body Day in the fall, which reviews what it defines as “fake Images” of the fashion, beauty and diet industries that are used instead. International No Diet Day is observed on May 6, and its symbol is a light blue ribbon. Read More…

Intermittent fasting

Intermittent fasting (IF) is an umbrella term for various diets that cycle between a period of fasting and non-fasting during a defined period. Intermittent fasting can also be used with calorie restriction for weight loss.

Some people may use intermittent fasting to diminish caloric intake and lose weight. Preliminary research indicates that intermittent fasting can affect risk factors for some diseases. Intermittent fasting protocols can be grouped into 2 categories: whole-day fasting and time-restricted feeding (TRF). The 5: 2 diet became popular in the UK in 2012 after the BBC2 television documentary Horizon Eat, Fast and Live Longer. Via sales of best-selling books, it became widely practiced. According to NHS Choices as of 2012, people considering the 5: 2 diet should first consult a physician, as fasting can sometimes be unsafe. In the UK, 5: 2 the diet could be reduced to the risk of breast cancer, but there is inadequate evidence for such statements. Read More…

Inedia

Inedia (Latin for “fasting”) or breatharianism is the belief that it is possible for a person to live without food. Breatharians claim that food, and in some cases water, are not necessary for survival, and that humans can be sustained by prana, the vital life force in Hinduism. According to Ayurveda, sunlight is one of the main sources of prana, and some practitioners believe that it is possible for a person to survive on sunlight alone. The terms breatharianism or inedia can also refer to this philosophy when it is practiced as a lifestyle in the current diet. Breatharianism is considered a deadly pseudoscience by scientists and medical professionals, and several adherents of these practices have died from starvation and dehydration. Read More…

Ikaria Study

The Ikaria Study is a small-scale survey by the University of Athens School of Medicine and the diet and lifestyle of Ikaria. The study found that the Ikarian diet includes olive oil, red wine, fish, coffee, herbal tea, honey, potatoes, garbanzo beans, black-eyed peas, lentils, and a limited amount of meat, sugar and dairy products, except goat milk . The data showed that people on Ikaria were reaching the age of 90 at 2.5 times the rate. Americans do, and that Ikarian men are almost at the same time. Read More…

High-protein diet

A high-protein diet is often recommended by bodybuilders and nutritionists to help you build muscle and lose fat. The high-protein diet is a nutrition that should be consumed every day. However, it should not be confused with low-carbohydrate diets, such as the Atkins Diet, which are not food-energy-controlled and which often contain large amounts of fat. Some examples of high-protein diet include lean beef, chicken or poultry, pork (tenderloin, rib chops, shoulder blade steak), salmon and tuna, eggs, soy, and lots more. A high-protein diet is often very low on fat or carbohydrates. Due to the limited amount of carbs available, the body starts burning extra body fats. People will often feel less hungry, thus, making them lose weight relatively easy. HOWEVER, Read More…

Herbal Magic

Herbal Magic is a Canadian blood loss and nutrition company based in Toronto, Ontario. Operating across a network of approximately 150 weight loss and nutrition centers across Canada, Herbal Magic is Canada’s largest commercial weight loss company. The program includes one-on-one personal coaching, natural health products, and grocery store bought food. Read More…

Healthy Lifestyles for High School Students

Health and fitness are dominating western culture, and they are able to communicate with others in their daily lives. point them in the right direction when starting on their road to fitness. This Wikipedia page aims to teach you how to maintain a healthy lifestyle, regardless of your financial status, schedule, or location. Highlights: Read More…

Healthy diet

A healthy diet is a diet that helps to maintain or improve overall health. A healthy diet provides the body with essential nutrition: fluid, macronutrients, micronutrients, and adequate calories. The requirements for a healthy diet can be made from a variety of plant-based and animal-based foods, although a non-animal source of vitamin B12 is required for those following a vegan diet. A healthy diet supports more calories than the body requires. A healthy diet, in addition to exercise, can obesity, heart disease, type 2 diabetes, hypertension and cancer. Various nutrition guides are published by medical and governmental institutions to educate individuals on what they should be eating to promote health. Nutrition facts labels are also mandatory in some countries to allow consumers to choose between foods based on health. The idea of ​​dietary therapy is quite old and has both modern scientific forms and medical prescrip- tions (such as dietary therapy in traditional Chinese medicine). A healthy diet contains a variety of different foods that the body can get the nutrients it requires to function properly. The idea of ​​dietary therapy is quite old and has both modern scientific forms and medical prescrip- tions (such as dietary therapy in traditional Chinese medicine). A healthy diet contains a variety of different foods that the body can get the nutrients it requires to function properly. The idea of ​​dietary therapy is quite old and has both modern scientific forms and medical prescrip- tions (such as dietary therapy in traditional Chinese medicine). A healthy diet contains a variety of different foods that the body can get the nutrients it requires to function properly. Read More…

Health Management Resources

HMR, is a part of Merck & Co. which offers a combination of structured diet, physical activity, and lifestyle-change coaching. It was founded in 1983, and has provided its programs to US hospitals, medical centers, provider groups, and health systems. More recently, HMR introduced a self-directed program that participants can access with the option of coaching support by phone. In 2013, HMR became a subsidiary of Merck & Co., Inc., and is part of Merck’s Healthcare Services & Solutions, an entity separate from the pharmaceutical business, which focuses on improving the healthcare experience for patients, providers, and payers. In 2017, US News & Read More…

Hay diet

The Hay Diet is a nutrition method developed by the New York physician William Howard Hay in the 1920s. It claims to work by separating food into three groups: alkaline, acidic, and neutral. (Acid foods are not combined with the alkaline ones. Acidic foods are protein rich, such as meat, fish, dairy, etc. Alkaline foods are rich carbohydrates, such as rice, grains and potatoes. It is also known as the food combining diet. A similar theory, called nutripathy, was developed by Gary A. Martin in the 1970s. Others who have promulgated alkaline-acid diets include Edgar Cayce, Jarvis DC, and Robert O. Young. Read More…

Hara hachi bun me

, (or hara hachi drunk, and sometimes misspelled hari hachi drunk), is a Confucian teaching that instructs people to eat until they are 80 percent full. Roughly, in English the Japanese phrase translates to, “Eat until you are eight parts (out of ten) full” or “belly 80 percent full”. Read More…

The Hacker’s Diet

‘The Hacker’s Diet’ is a diet plan created by the founder of Autodesk, John Walker, outlined in an electronic book of the same name, which attempts to aid the process of weight loss by more precisely modeling how calories consumed and calories expended actually impact weight. Walker notes that much of our fat free mass introduces noise signal when we gain or gain weight. With the help of a graphing tool (Excel is used in the book), he addresses these problems. Factoring in exercise, and through counting calories, one can calculate one ‘s own total energy expenditure (basal metabolic rate, thermic effect of food, Read More…

Grapefruit diet

The grapefruit diet, also known as the Hollywood Diet is a short-term fad diet that has existed in the United States since at least the 1930s. The diet is based on a grapefruit has a fat-burning enzyme or similar property. The variations of the diet are so low in calories (below 800-1,000 calories a day), too low in carbohydrates, or too low in essential micronutrients are considered unhealthy and dangerous. While eating a grapefruit juice with a meal, it can be used in the diet of a person who is allergic to a person with grapefruit juice or is allergic to citrus. This diet will not be beneficial to anyone over a long period of time because of the low calorie intake could lead to malnutrition and many health problems. The grapefruit diet also does not require exercise. The grapefruit diet is a low-carb diet. It suggests that grapefruit helps to burn body fat when eaten with foods in dietary fat, which is why the grapefruit diet encourages consumption of meat, eggs, and other foods that are rich in fat and protein. Read More…

Gluten-free, casein-free diet

Gluten-free casein-free diet (GFCF diet), also known as gluten-free dairy-free diet (GFDF diet), is a diet that does not include the gluten proteins (found most often in wheat, barley, and rye), and casein (found most often in milk and dairy products). In spite of the absence of scientific evidence, there have been advocates for the treatment of autism and related conditions.

The majority of the evidence does not support the use of this diet in the treatment of autism.

The diet may be a negative effect on bone health, or is caused by autism. Read More…

Gluten-free diet

A gluten-free diet (GFD) is a diet that strictly excludes gluten, a mixture of proteins found in wheat and related grains, including barley, rye, oat, and all their species and hybrids (such as spelt, kamut, and triticale) . The inclusion of a gluten-free diet remains controversial, and may be dependent on the cultivar and cross-contamination with other gluten-containing cereals. Gluten-related disorders, including celiac disease (CD), non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS), gluten ataxia, dermatitis herpetiformis (DH), and wheat allergy. In these people, the objective of the study is to show that they have an incomplete treatment of small bowel disease, despite a strict gluten-free diet. This is caused by inadvertent ingestion of gluten. People with poor basic education and understanding of gluten-free diet often believe that they are strictly following the diet, but are making regular errors. In addition, a gluten-free diet may, in at least some cases, improve gastrointestinal or systemic symptoms in bowel syndrome-like diseases, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis or HIV enteropathy, among others. <Ref name = ElChammasDanner2011Quotation> Gluten-free diets have been promoted as an alternative treatment of autism, but the current evidence for their efficacy is limited and weak. Gluten proteins have low nutritional and biological value, and the grains that contain gluten are not essential in the human diet. HOWEVER, An unbalanced selection of food and an incorrect choice of gluten-free replacement products may lead to nutritional deficiencies. Read More…

Fruits & Veggies – More Matters

Fruits & Veggies – More Matters is a national public health initiative from Produce for Better Health Foundation and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to increase the consumption of fruits and vegetables. This campaign, begun in 2007, took the place of the 5 A Day program. The shift has been implemented in the United States, which recommended more than 5 servings of fruits and vegetables for Americans. Read More…

Freeganism

Freeganism is a practice and ideology of limited participation in the economy and minimizes consumption of resources, particularly through recovering wasted goods like food. The word “freegan” is a portmanteau of “free” and “vegan”. While vegans might avoid buying animal products as an act of protest against animal exploitation, freegans-at least in theory-avoid buying anything as an act of protest against the food system in general. Freeganism is often presented as synonymous with “dumpster diving” for discarded food, freegans are distinguished by their association with an anti-consumerist and anti-capitalist ideology and their commitment in a wider range of alternative living strategies, such as voluntary voluntary unemployment, squatting abandoned buildings, and “guerilla gardening” Read More…

Fooya

Fooya (styled as fooya!) Is a mobile mobile app that uses gamification of learning and educational entertainment to induce its users to improve their dietary choices. It was developed by the mHealth company FriendsLearn; The product team is led by Bhargav Sri Prakash, who devised the concept when he was a fellow of the Kauffman Foundation. Read More…

Food combining

Food combining (also known as a trophic) is a term for a dietary approach that advocates specific combinations of foods as well as carbohydrate-rich foods and protein-rich foods in the same meal. It was prepared by Herbert M. Shelton in his book Food Combining Made Easy (1951). The best-known food-combining diet is the Hay Diet; Hay lost 30 pounds in 3 months when he implemented his research. One randomized controlled trial of food combining has been performed, and found no evidence that a balanced diet has been achieved. Read More…

Food and drink prohibitions

Some people abstain from various foods and beverages in conformity with various religious, cultural, legal or other societal prohibitions. Many of these prohibitions constitute taboos. Many mammals, rodents, reptiles, amphibians, fishes, molluscs, crustaceans and insects, which may be related to a plant-based food. Some prohibitions are specific to a particular part of the excretion of an animal, while others forgo the consumption of plants or fungi. Food prohibitions can be defined as rules, or by which foods, or combinations of foods, may be prepared or prepared. The origins of these prohibitions are varied. In some cases, they are thought to be a result of health considerations or other practical reasons; in others, they report to human symbolic systems. Some foods may be prohibited during certain religious periods (eg, Slow), at certain stages of life (eg, pregnancy), or to certain classes of people (eg, priests), even though the food is otherwise permitted. We have a comparative basis of food that can not be more easily made. Whether scientifically correct or not, often food is meant to protect the individual, but there are many other reasons for their existence. An ecological or medical background is apparent in many, some of which are seen as religious or spiritual in origin. Food taboos can help using a resource more efficiently, but when applied to a section of the community, a food taboo can also lead to the monopolization of a food item by those exempted. A food taboo is a part of their ways, aids in the cohesion of the group, which assists the group to stand out and maintain its identity in the face of others and thus creates a feeling of “belonging”. Read More…

FODMAP

FODMAPs are short chain carbohydrates that are poorly absorbed in the small intestine. They include short chain oligo-saccharide polymers of fructose (fructans) and galactooligosaccharides (GOS, stachyose, raffinose), disaccharides (lactose), monosaccharides (fructose), and sugar alcohols (polyols), such as sorbitol, mannitol, xylitol and maltitol. The term FODMAP is an acronym, derived from “Fermentable Oligo-, Di-, Monosaccharides And Polyols”. Although FODMAPs are naturally present in food and the human diet, FODMAP has been found to improve bowel syndrome (IBS) and other functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID). Prior to the training of the FODMAP concept, was used as a first line therapy for IBS and other FGID. Read More…

Feingold diet

The Feingold diet is an elimination diet initiated by Dr. Benjamin Feingold following research in the 1970s which appeared to link food additives with hyperactivity; by eliminating these additives and various foods the diet was supposed to alleviate the condition. Popular in its day, the diet has been referred to as “outmoded treatment”; There is no good evidence that it is effective, and it is difficult for people to follow. Read More…

Valter Longo

Valter D. Longo (born October 9, 1967) is an Italian-American biogerontologist and cell biologist known for his studies on the role of fasting and nutrient response. mechanisms in many eukaryotes. He is currently a professor at the USC Davis School of Gerontology with a joint appointment in the Department of Biological Sciences and the USC Longevity Institute. Read More…

Fasting

Fasting is the willing abstinence, or drink, or both, for a period of time. An absolute fast or dry fasting is usually defined as abstinence from all food and liquid for a defined period, usually 24 hours, or a number of days. Water fasting refers to abstinence from all food and drink except water, but black coffee and tea may be consumed. Other fasts may be partially restrictive, limiting only foods or substances, or be intermittent. In a physiological context, the metabolic state of the metabolic system is described in the following table, or in the metabolic state after complete digestion and absorption of a meal. Several metabolic adjustments occur during fasting. Some diagnostic tests are used to determine a fasting state. For example, a person is assumed to be fasting 8-12 hours ago. Metabolic changes of the fasting state after absorption of a meal (typically 3-5 hours after eating). A rapid diagnosis of prolonged fasting (from 8-72 hours, depending on age), usually hypoglycemia. Many people may also have a medical procedure or a check-up, such as preceding colonoscopy or surgery. Fasting may also be part of a religious ritual. usually hypoglycemia. Many people may also have a medical procedure or a check-up, such as preceding colonoscopy or surgery. Fasting may also be part of a religious ritual. usually hypoglycemia. Many people may also have a medical procedure or a check-up, such as preceding colonoscopy or surgery. Fasting may also be part of a religious ritual. Read More…

Fad diet

A fad diet or dietary supplement is a diet that makes it more likely that it will be more likely to have a significant impact on life. <ref name = “Nestle2006b”> Celebrity endorsements are frequently used to promote fad diets, which may generate significant revenue for the creators of the product. Read More…

F-plan

The F-plan is a high fiber diet designed to induce healthy weight loss, created in the 1980s by British author Audrey Eyton, founder of Slimming Magazine, and based on the work of Denis Burkitt. The F-Plan diet book was in the top ten books in America in April and May 1983. The diet works by restricting the daily intake of calories to less than 1,500 while consuming well-above the recommended level of dietary fiber. The fiber has a number of beneficial effects, such as making the dieter feel “full” for much longer than normal, reducing the urge to overeat, and promoting a healthy digestive system. The disadvantages include excessive flatulence in the first few weeks and having to eat food. Some people also express a dislike of the texture of such a high fiber diet. The dieter will need to consume more water than usual to prevent constipation. Nevertheless, the diet is very effective when followed faithfully and remains a popular choice of diet. In 2006 Audrey Eyton published “F2,” a revised version of the F-plan written in the light of subsequent medical discoveries, which claims to be more effective and campaigns against low-carbohydrate diets, particularly the Atkins Diet. Read More…

Ethicurean

An ethicurean is a person who attempts to combine ethical food consumption with an interest in epicureanism, and ethically without depriving oneself of taste. The approach takes into account the effect of one’s food production and the environment, as well as the quality of life in the production of everything they consume. An ethicurean also commits to minimizing the amount of waste produced, the recycling of waste and the mindful use of resources (energy, water etc.). Read More…

Ethical omnivorism

Ethical omnivorism or carnivorous carnivorism is a human diet involving the consumption of meat, eggs, dairy and produce that can be traced back to a farm that raises grass -fed, free range, antibiotic and hormone-free livestock, uses GMO-free feed, and grows pesticide-free produce and greens. Ocean fish consumption is limited to sustainably farmed and / or ethically and wild caught, without contributing to illegal poaching. Critics contend that ethical omnivorism places greater strain on animals and the environment than intensive animal farming. Read More…

Elimination diet

An elimination diet, also known as exclusion diet, is a diagnostic procedure used to identify foods that an individual can not consume without adverse effects. Adverse effects may be due to food allergy, food intolerance, other physiological mechanisms, such as metabolic or toxins, or a combination of these. Elimination diets (http://www.biodiversity.com/index.php?title=english). In rare cases, a health professional may wish to use an oligoantigenic diet to relieve a patient of symptoms they are experiencing. Common reasons for undertaking an elimination diet include suspected food allergies and suspected food intolerances. An elimination diet may be one or more common foods, such as eggs or milk, or it may be more or less non-nutritive substances, such as artificial food colorings. An elimination diet related to trial and error to identify specific allergies and intolerances. Typically, if symptoms resolve after the removal of a food from the diet, then the food is reintroduced to see whether the symptoms reappear. This challenge-dechallenge-rechallenge has been reported with intermittent or vague symptoms. The exclusion can be used to diagnose the problem or to determine whether a patient’s symptoms are food-related. The term elimination diet is also used to describe a “treatment diet”, which eliminates certain foods for a patient. Adverse reactions to food can be due to several mechanisms. Correct identification of the type of reaction in an individual is important, as different approaches to management may be required. The area of ​​food allergies and intolerances has been controversial and is currently being researched. It has been characterized in the past by the lack of universal acceptance of definitions, diagnosis and treatment. Read More…

Elemental diet

An elemental diet is a diet that proposes ingestion, or in a more severe case of a gastric feeding tube or intravenous feeding, of liquid nutrients in an easily assimilated form. It is usually composed of amino acids, fats, sugars, vitamins, and minerals. This diet, however, lacks an allergic reaction in some people.

There is no good evidence that elemental diets are effective in treating chronic pouchitis. Read More…

Eatwell plate

The Eatwell Plate is a pictorial summary of the hand food groups and their recommended proportions for a healthy diet. It is the method for illustrating dietary advice by the Department of Health, officially appointed by the government of the United Kingdom. The Eatwell is known as The Balance of Good Health. The Eatwell Plate Was superseded by the Eatwell Guide published on the 17th March 2016. Read More…

Duke Diet and Fitness Center

Established in 1969, the Duke Diet and Fitness Center is one of America’s longest running residential care centers, and has a combination of lifestyle and lifestyle. The world of nutrition, fitness, behavioral health, medical management, and ongoing support.

The Duke Diet & Fitness Center is located in Durham, NC. 2) fitness / exercise 3) behavioral modification and 4) managing medical conditions. A study of participants showed that after two years, 54.9% maintained their weight loss. Read More…

Dietary management

Dietary management, also known as “foodservice management”, is the practice of providing nutritional options for individuals and groups through diet services. Practitioners in dietary management, known as dietary managers, work in hospitals, long-term care facilities, restaurants, school and cafeterias, correctional facilities, and other foodservice settings, usually implemented by a dietitian or nutritionist. They are responsible for supervising the work of other personal nutrition such as cooks and dietary aids. dietary management is called food service management Read More…

Dietary energy supply

The diet is available for human consumption, usually in kilocalories or kilojoules per person per day. It gives an overestimate of the total amount of food consumed as it is both food consumed and food wasted. It varies markedly between different regions and countries of the world. It has also changed significantly over the 21st century. Dietary energy supply is correlated with the rate of obesity. Read More…

Diet food

Diet food (or dietetic food) refers to any food or beverage whose recipe is altered to reduce fat, carbohydrates, and / or sugar in order to make it part of a weight loss program or diet. Such foods are usually intended for use in weight loss or a change in body type, or bodybuilding supplements.

In addition to other words or phrases are used to identify and describe these foods including light, zero calorie, low calorie, low fat, no fat and sugar free. In some areas use of these terms may be regulated by law. For example, in the US, a product labeled as “low fat”; and to be labeled “fat free” it must contain less than 0.5 grams of fat per serving. Read More…

Diet and obesity

Diet plays an important role in the genesis of obesity. Personal choices, advertising, social customs, and cultural influences.

The diet is available for human consumption, usually expressed in kilocalories per person per day. It gives an overestimate of the total amount of food consumed as it is both food consumed and food wasted. The per capita dietary energy supply varies markedly between different regions and countries. It has also changed significantly over time. From the early 1970s to the late 1990s, the average calories available per person per day has increased in all parts of the world except for Eastern Europe and parts of Africa. The United States had the highest availability with 3654 kilograms of calories per person in 1996. This increased further in 2002 to 3770. During the late 1990s, Europeans had 3394 kilo calories per person, in the developing areas of Asia there were 2648 kilo calories per person , Read More…

Diabetic diet

A diabetic diet is a diet that is used by people with diabetes mellitus or high blood glucose to minimize symptoms and dangerous consequences of the disease. Since carbohydrate is the macronutrient that raises blood glucose levels most significantly, the greatest debate is how low in carbohydrates the diet should be. This low-calorie carbohydrate intake will help reduce blood glucose levels, a low-carbohydrate diet, and carbohydrates should be the main source of calories. Recommendations of the fraction of total calories to be obtained from carbohydrate in the range of 20% to 45%, but recommendations can vary from 16% to 75%. For overweight and obese people with type 2 diabetes, any weight-loss which is likely to be at least partly effective. The most agreed-upon recommendation is for the diet to be low in sugar and refined carbohydrates, while relatively high in dietary fiber, especially soluble fiber. People with diabetes are also encouraged to eat small meals. Likewise, people with diabetes may be encouraged to reduce their intake of carbohydrates that have a high glycemic index (GI), although this is also controversial. (In cases of hypoglycemia, they are advised to have a high blood glucose tolerance, such as a sugary sports drink, followed by a long-acting carbohydrate (such as rye bread) to prevent the risk of further hypoglycemia.) question the usefulness of the glycemic index and recommend high-GI foods like potatoes and rice. Read More…

Detoxification (alternative medicine)

Detoxification (sometimes called body cleansing) is a type of alternative medicine that is used to treat toxins in the body. Activities commonly associated with detoxification include dieting, fasting, or specific foods (such as fats, carbohydrates, fruits, vegetables, juices, herbs, or water), colon cleansing, chelation therapy, and the removal of dental fillings. The concept of science and health for the scientific and financial institutions of the United States. The “toxins” usually remain undefined, with little to no evidence of toxic accumulation in the patient. Read More…

Demitarian

Democracy is the practice of making a conscious effort The term was devised in October 2009 in Barsac, France at the combined workshop of Nitrogen in Europe (NinE) and Biodiversity in European Grasslands: Impacts of Nitrogen (BEGIN) where they developed “The Barsac Declaration: Environmental Sustainability and the Demitic Diet”. The declaration has been developed as a result of the involvement of large-scale animal farming as a primary contributor to disruptions in the nitrogen cycle and subsequent effects on air, land, water, climate and biodiversity. Overconsumption of meat is also considered to contribute to various health risks which can be mitigated with reduced meat consumption. Demitarians are committed to a healthy diet. The term half is from the Latin dimedius meaning half. The Demitarian diet is to be literally “halved” the standard portion of meat products that would be consumed in a regular meal. This portion is being prepared with a correspondingly larger portion of vegetables or other food products. The diet also allows for the practice of not eating meat on certain days but is not confused with “Flexitarians”. Flexitarians eat a predominantly vegetarian diet, but do not have the same effect. The diet also allows for the practice of not eating meat on certain days but is not confused with “Flexitarians”. Flexitarians eat a predominantly vegetarian diet, but do not have the same effect. The diet also allows for the practice of not eating meat on certain days but is not confused with “Flexitarians”. Flexitarians eat a predominantly vegetarian diet, but do not have the same effect. Read More…

DASH diet

The DASH diet is a dietary pattern sponsored by the US-based National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), an agency of the United States Department of Health. Human Services) to prevent and control hypertension. The DASH diet is rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and low-fat dairy foods; includes meat, fish, poultry, nuts, and beans; and is limited in sugar-sweetened foods and beverages, red meat, and added fats. In addition to its effect on blood pressure, it is designed to be a well-balanced approach to eating for the general public. DASH is recommended by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) as one of its ideal eating plans for all Americans. The DASH diet is based on NIH studies that examined three dietary plans and their results. None of the plans were vegetarian, but the DASH plan included more fruits and vegetables, low fat or no dairy, beans, and nuts than the others studied. The DASH diet reduces blood pressure by 6 mm Hg and diastolic blood pressure by 3 mm Hg in patients with high normal blood pressure (formerly called “pre-hypertension”). Read More…

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